Courses for Fall, 2012

102: Introduction to Literature (4 credits)
Pre- or Co- requisite: ENGL 101. An introduction to literary appreciation, analysis, and interpretive techniques with an emphasis on close reading enhanced by class discussions and expository essays. Required for major and minor. Humanities Core. Major/Minor Requirement.
Professor: David Havird. MWF 1:00-1:50

More about the course:
Introduction to Literature will make you familiar with the techniques of close reading and acquaint you with some of the ways that people read who have made the study of literature a discipline. In this course you'll develop the critical acumen and dexterity to apply multiple perspectives when reading stories, poems, or plays and to use whichever interpretive techniques best suit your aims and those of the text. You can expect to become a more attentive and creative reader, whose analytical and interpretive skills manifest an ever greater sophistication and whose writing displays an ever finer clarity of expression.

178: Introduction to Film Art (4 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the study and analysis of film. Students will learn the fundamentals of film form, style, and history. Topics include narrative structure, cinematography, editing, sound, and genre. This course also prepares students for more advanced study in film seminars as well as film and video production. This course meets six hours per week, three of which are devoted to screenings.
Professor: Michelle Glaros. TR 9:45-11:00, T 6:30-9:430

201: Introductory Seminar in Literature and Culture (4 credits)
Pre- or Co- requisite: English 101. Intensive readings of literary works, studied within their cultural contexts, in such generically or topically oriented subjects as the American Short Story, Modern Drama, Literature and War, Modern American Poetry, Multicultural Autobiography, Literature of Social Change, and Southern Literature. May be taken two times as topic changes. Humanities Core. Challenge Core.
Professor: Jeff Hendricks. M 1:00-3:45

More about the course:
The topic this semester is "Modernist Fiction."

211: Introduction to Scriptwriting (4 credits)
This course is primarily a writing workshop in which students are introduced to writing for film, television, and the stage. Emphasis is on creating believable settings, fluid dialog, memorable characters, and strong storylines. Students will produce four-five short scripts (4-8 pages) to be critiqued in class as well as analyze scripts by such writers as Thornton Wilder, Eugene Ionesco, and Quentin Tarantino. For a final project each student must submit 24-28 pages of edited writing.
Instructor: Jeffrey Kallenberg. M 6:30-9:30

219: Creative Writing: The Craft of Poetry (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Creative Writing comprises two courses, the Craft of Poetry and the Craft of Fiction, offered alternately in fall, combining seminar and workshop in which students read and formally analyze model work by established and emerging authors and produce creative work, poetry or short fiction, of their own, applying the techniques of the genre. Humanities Core.
Professor: David Havird. TR 9:45-11:00

More about the course:
Creative Writing: The Craft of Poetry will acquaint you with the essential techniques of verse composition. In a setting that combines seminar and workshop, we'll analyze exemplary work by established and emerging authors, critique submissions by you and your peers, and produce original poetry. Our objective is to recognize excellence of expression and to create works of technical sophistication that have a life independent of anyone's personal life and that communicate their meaning effectively with an audience. In addition to original work in verse, there will be brief analyses to write and quizzes to take.

290: Interdisciplinary Studies (4 credits)
Pre- or Co-requisite: ENGL 101. This course is designed to facilitate the treatment of topics across disciplinary boundaries. May be taken two times as topic changes. Humanities Core. Sustainability Challenge Core.
Professor: Jeanne Hamming. TR 9:45-11:00

More about the course:
The topic of this 290 is "The Culture and Politics of Sustainability." Despite the popular perception that sustainability is merely a recent trend in environmentalism, the term actually refers to the complex, (eco)systemic interactions between and among economic, political, material, and cultural forces at work in our world. Sustainability (and sustainable development) was defined by the Brundtland commission, in a report called Our Common Future (1987) as "meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Sustainability, in other words, depends on our ability to understand the economic, political, material, and social forces for the benefit of current and future inhabitants of our planet. Throughout the semester, students will consider issues related to sustainability in both local and global contexts by exploring a variety of Humanist approaches to cultural inquiry—literary analysis, film and media studies, political science, economics, philosophy, history. At the same time, students will be invited to explore their own sense of place within a broader community and will explore ways to live and act sustainably. This course meets the requirements for the sustainability challenge core in the Humanities.

301S: Seminar in Literature and Culture (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Intensive readings of literary works, studied within their cultural contexts, in such generically or topically oriented subjects as the Postcolonial Novel, Women’s Literature, Sex and Gender, Literature of Diaspora, Caribbean Poetry, etc. May be taken two times as topic changes. Humanities Core. Diversity Challenge Core.
Professor: Jeanne Hamming. TR 1:00-2:15

More about the course:
The topic of this 301S is "Sexual Diversity in Literature and Film." In this course students will examine the construction of modern conceptions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered "identity." Topics to be addressed will include: the essentialism/constructionism controversy in relation to gender and to sexual preference, changing historical definitions of sexual minorities, and contemporary stereotypes and cultural representations of sexual minorities, including: the relation of sexual orientation to modern notions of gender (F2M, drag, butch/femme, "drag kings") and race; and current "political" controversies about civil rights, changing ideas of the family, gay marriage, the origins of sexual orientation, and the role science and medicine plays in defining sexuality and gender. Students will also be introduced to current trends in queer theory and feminism as it relates to sexual and gender identity. This course meets the requirements for the Diversity challenge core in the Humanities.

313W: Advanced Rhetoric (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Advanced Rhetoric teaches techniques essential in developing public arguments. The course has a significant historical element, focusing on how such public arguments have been structured according to available media. At the same time, it emphasizes the historical volatility of language and the changing conventions of grammar, mechanics, and punctuation. Knowledge of these developments is the basis for practice in professional editing. Students will write in a variety of expository forms, and they will practice editing their own work and that of others. Course work will culminate in a substantial portfolio that demonstrates their competence as writers and editors.
Professor: Steve Shelburne. MWF 11:00-11:50

314W: Advertising and Public Relations (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101. This course surveys the related fields of advertising and public relations and examines their role in contemporary society. Topics include history, law, ethics, social dynamics, and economic implications as well as the creative and technical elements of the advertising and public relations campaign. The process of advertising and public relations is studied from the perspectives of art, business, and communication.
Instructor: Michael Laffey. MWF 10:00-10:50

321: Seminar in Literary History (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101. This course designates a variety of topically focused seminars on British and American literary periods or movements, such as Medieval and Early Modern British literature, the Romantic Period and the Victorian Age, Colonial American literature, the American literary renaissance, and Modernism. These seminars emphasize the study of primary texts and critical analysis and research. May be taken three times as topic changes. Humanities Core.
Professor: George Newtown. MW 1:30-2:45, F 2:00-2:50

More about the course:
The topic this semester is Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature.

322: British Literary Traditions (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101. The course introduces students to some major British writers and to profitable approaches to their works while providing opportunities for students to refine their critical practices. Students should expect to finish the course with a broad, if skeptical, understanding of the conventional periodic divisions of British literature, an appreciation of the critical notions of “traditions” and “canon,” and a sense of the pleasure to be derived from reading and discussing fine writing. The course offers students abundant opportunity for the close reading of complex texts. Major/Minor Requirement. Humanities Core.
Professor: Steve Shelburne. MWF 9:00-9:50

333W: Seminar in Literary Genres (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101. This course designates a variety of seminars devoted to a single literary genre or two complementary genres, focusing on primary texts that illustrate characteristics of the genre as it has developed historically and, to a lesser extent, on theoretical examinations of it. Regularly offered seminars include the British Novel, the American Novel, and the Lyric Poem. May be taken three times as topic changes. Humanities Core.
Professor: David Havird. MWF 10:00-10:50

More about the course:
Seminar in Literary Genres: The Lyric Poem is an intensive study of the short poem. Its aims are to provide a historical survey of the lyric in English, to generate a theoretical understanding of the lyric as a literary genre, and to develop a critical appreciation of the genre, including a vocabulary of terms and the analytical and interpretive skills appropriate to the study. We'll accomplish these aims through the study of representative poems by English and American poets spanning five centuries—in the shorter fifth edition of The Norton Anthology of Poetry. Along the way we'll read influential statements about the genre by practitioners of the craft. There will be papers to write and tests to take.

368: Film History (4 credits)
This course is a chronological survey of the cinema from its beginnings in the 1890s to the present. Special attention is paid to major directors, influential national cinemas, and to dominant styles and genres. This course meets six hours per week, three of which are devoted to screenings.
Professor: Jeff Hendricks. T 1:00-3:45, R 1:00-3:45

473: Senior Seminar (4 credits)
A capstone course in which Senior English majors will 1) assemble a writing portfolio which includes a 15-20 page Senior Essay and 2) take a comprehensive exam over a reading list provided by the English department. A substantial part of the course is not only reviewing for the comprehensive exam and writing/revising the Senior Essay, but also researching and planning for life after college, including career exploration and the graduate school admission process. Major Requirement.
Professor: Jeanne Hamming. M 6:30-9:30

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