Core Rubrics

Outcomes and Rubric for Mathematics Core Classes

Outcome 1: Students will be able to represent real-life problems through the use of mathematical formulas.

3 points The student correctly represents the real-life problem through the use of the formula.
2 points The student misrepresents minor features of the problem through the use of the formula.
1 point The student misrepresents multiple features of the problem through the use of the formula.
0 points The student exhibits little or no understanding of the problem through the use of the formula.

Benchmark 70% of students will score a 2 or 3.

Outcome 2: Students will be able to solve problems using symbolic manipulation.

3 points The student gives the correct answer and uses the correct steps.
2 points The student makes a calculation error causing an incorrect solution.
1 point The student makes multiple calculation errors or faulty inferences.
0 points The student exhibits little or no understanding of symbolic manipulation.

Benchmark 70% of students will score a 2 or 3.

Outcome 3: Students will be able to interpret the meaning of mathematical representations.

3 points The student correctly and fully interprets the meaning of the mathematical representation.
2 points The student exhibits general understanding of the meaning but misses some of the appropriate details.
1 point The student uses some of the correct terminology but fails to exhibit general understanding.
0 points The student exhibits little or no understanding of the meaning of the mathematical representation.

Benchmark 60% of students will score a 2 or 3.

Outcome 4: Students will be able to verify the validity of a mathematical argument.

3 points The student correctly identifies validity and correctly verifies his/her claim.
2 points The student correctly identifies validity, but fails to completely justify his/her claim.
1 point The student exhibits some understanding of the argument, but fails to establish validity.
0 points The student exhibits little or no understanding of the mathematical argument.

Benchmark 50% of students will score a 2 or 3.

Outcomes and Rubrics for Social Science Core Courses

Questions will be developed by individual departments that offer core courses in the social sciences. The style of question(s) may vary from multiple choice to essay format. All questions will be designed to assess aspects of the social-sciences core courses' primary objective, which is to "teach students how to examine human behavior through the systematic analysis of data."

Goal Statement

Students will be able to systematically analyze data related to human behavior.

Intended Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate their ability to assess the nature and scope of the problem.
  2. Students will determine and perform appropriate analysis, given the problem or questions.
  3. Students will draw conclusions based on analysis and understanding of research in the social sciences literature.

Means of Assessment

Questions may tap into the following to assess the three intended outcomes:

  1. Define initial problem statement/ pick out the main claim
    Distinguish between essential and nonessential considerations
    Realize the importance of certain facts
  2. Compute rates and proportions using quantitative data
    Use charts and numerical data tables to draw specific conclusions
    Recognize patterns in quantitative and qualitative data
  3. Make logical connections between different facts or ideas and outline the significance of those connections
    Identify factors that might complicate interpretation

No matter the style of question each department chooses to administer (e.g., essay, multiple choice, short answer, etc) individual student responses will be graded using the following 3-point Rubric.

Outcome 1

2 points Student exhibits a well-developed ability to assess the nature and scope of the problem.
1 point Student exhibits some ability to assess the nature and scope of the problem, but significant shortcomings are evident in his/her skills.
0 points Student exhibits little to no ability to assess the nature and scope of the problem.

Outcome 2

2 points Student exhibits a well-developed ability to determine and perform appropriate analysis, given the problem or questions
1 point Student exhibits some ability to determine and perform appropriate analysis, given the problem or questions, but significant shortcomings are evident in his/her skills.
0 points Student exhibits little to no ability to determine and perform appropriate analysis, given the problem or questions

Outcome 3

2 points Student exhibits a well-developed ability to draw conclusions based on analysis and understanding of research in the social sciences literature.
1 point Student exhibits some ability to draw conclusions based on analysis and understanding of research in the social sciences literature, but significant shortcomings are evident in his/her skills.
0 points Student exhibits little to no ability to draw conclusions based on analysis and understanding of research in the social sciences literature.

Sample Questions

Sample questions relevant to Psychology and Sociology Core classes are attached. The Psychology questions were written by Dave Stafford; the Sociology questions were written by Loren Demerath.

Sample questions relevant to Psychology's courses in the Social-Sciences Core

Imagine the following experiment: 50 people are randomly divided into two groups. One group spends 30 minutes reading a newspaper selected by the experimenters, whereas another group spends 30 minutes watching a television news program. Each person is tested separately; that is, participants are located by themselves in a room and do not discuss what they read or hear with one another. Afterwards, each person is given a test concerning current world events. The graph shown below depicts the results of this hypothetical experiment.

Questions

  1. What was the independent variable in this experiment?
  2. What was the dependent variable in this experiment?
  3. What conclusions can be drawn from this experiment?
  4. What are some factors that might complicate the interpretation of these results?

Imagine another experiment: a group of people in the same mathematics class record how long they slept the past night. Later that day, each person takes a math test. The graph shown below depicts the findings.

Questions

  1. What is an appropriate conclusion you can draw from these data?
  2. What factors might complicate the interpretation of these results?

Sample questions relevant to Sociology's courses in the Social-Sciences Core

Questions

  1. Construct questions for a survey that would assess _. Describe what procedures you would take in administering that survey, and explain why.
  2. The following is a crosstab of race by political participation. Noting the chi-square significance level at the bottom, and the column percentages in the cells of the tables, what could you conclude from the crosstab, and what numbers might be helpful to use in describing your conclusions?
  3. In going over transcripts of interviews with single, teen mothers, you might note a variety of patterns in their responses. What kinds of patterns might you see?

Outcomes and Rubrics for Humanities Performance/ Production Core Courses

Goal Statement

Students will be able to demonstrate an aesthetic appreciation of human artistic and cultural accomplishments through performance or production.

Intended Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate their ability to learn artistic techniques or repertory.
  2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the stylistic context of their work.

Means of Assessment

Students will present their artistic product for a faculty critique. Critiques may use any of the following methods of assessment:

Rubric

Outcome 1

0 Student exhibits no increase in skill level.
1 Student exhibits a moderate increase in skill level.
2 Student exhibits a substantial increase in skill level.

Outcome 2

0 Student exhibits no understanding of the stylistic context of his/her work.
1 Student exhibits a moderate understanding of the stylistic context of his/her work.
2 Student exhibits a substantial understanding of the stylistic context of his/her work.

Outcomes and Rubrics for Humanities Core Courses (other than Performance/ Production Core Courses)

Goal Statement:

Students will be able to critically analyze and evaluate human artistic and cultural accomplishments.

Intended Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate their ability to critically analyze artistic and cultural accomplishments.
  2. Students will demonstrate their ability to evaluate artistic and cultural accomplishments.

Means of Assessment

Students will present their analyses and evaluations for faculty assessment. Students may demonstrate their abilities through any of the following assignments:
* written or oral assignments (essays, essay exams, presentations)
* written tests on course content

Rubric

Outcome 1

0 points Student exhibits no ability to critically analyze artistic and cultural accomplishments.
1 point Student exhibits a moderate ability to critically analyze artistic and cultural accomplishments.
2 points Student exhibits a substantial ability to critically analyze artistic and cultural accomplishments.

Outcome 2

0 points Student exhibits no ability to evaluate artistic and cultural accomplishments.
1 point Student exhibits a moderate ability to evaluate artistic and cultural accomplishments.
2 points Student exhibits a substantial ability to evaluate artistic and cultural accomplishments.

Natural Sciences Objectives and Rubrics for Assessment

The following three objectives were developed for natural science general education core courses.

Objective 1: Students will summarize at least two laws, theories, or concepts fundamental to the discipline under study.

Level 3 Exceptional understanding
• The student accomplishes both additional tasks under Level 2.
Level 2 Effective understanding
The student completes all the task under Level 1 and either
• shows how the law, principle or concept can be applied to a specific case or generalized to a broader range of phenomena, or
• notes the problematic areas or the limitations of the theory or concept.
Level 1 Adequate understanding
• The student correctly states the law, theory or concept being described using appropriate terminology.
• The student identifies the phenomena or general situation to which the law, theory, or concept can be applied.
• The student cites two lines of evidence supporting the law, theory, or concept.
Level 0 Unsatisfactory
• The student fails to accomplish the tasks described under Level 1.

It is expected that 75% of the students will achieve Level 1 or higher and 40% will achieve Level 2 or higher.

Objective 2: Students will apply fundamental concepts of the science being studied to explain a natural phenomenon. (Given an observation, explain it.)

Level 3 Exceptional understanding
• The student accomplishes both additional items listed under Level 2.
Level 2 Effective understanding
The student accomplishes all of the tasks under Level 1, and either
• identifies the reasons for variation in the data set, or
• Notes problematic areas or limitations in the explanation of the phenomenon.
Level 1 Adequate understanding
• The student correctly identifies which principles are appropriate for the explanation. (Or is it acceptable to have the question specify this?)
• The student identifies the aspects of the phenomenon that can be explained by the principle or theory.
• The student correctly identifies the causal connections that allow the data to be explained by the concepts.
Level 0 Unsatisfactory
• The student fails to accomplish the tasks described under Level 1.

It is expected that 75% of the students will achieve Level 1 or higher and 40% will achieve Level 2 or higher.

Objective 3: Students will demonstrate through laboratory activities the ability to make measurements and interpret the results.

Level 1 Adequate understanding
The student correctly measures two different features in a material test or experiment and correctly relates the measurements graphically or descriptively.
The student correctly interprets relationships between the observed features.
Level 0 Unsatisfactory
The student fails to accomplish the tasks described under Level 1.

It is expected that 75% of the students will achieve Level 1.

Login