Summer School Information

Centenary College is excited to offer several summer school options for students this year!

 
Summer Terms
June mini-term: June 6-June 24
July mini-term: June 27-July 15
Summer Term: June 6-July 15
 
Summer Tuition
Centenary summer tuition is competitive at $480 per credit hour.
 
Registration
Students may register for summer courses through their faculty advisor or through the Registrar’s Office. Classes will be posted and students can begin registering March 14, 2022.

June Mini-Term Courses 2022

PSY 304: Statistics for Behavorial Science

PSY 304: Statistics for Behav. Science
Term: JUN - 202240
Instructor: Jessica Alexander
Format: Online
Days and Times: M T W R F -
Description: Prerequisite: MATH 104 or higher. Statistical analysis is a fundamental tool that scientists use to make sense of the world. In this course, students will learn to work with data, use it to make reasoned inferences, and communicate results in a professional style. The course will explore descriptive statistics, statistical inference, correlation and regression, t-tests, analysis of variance, chi-square, and nonparametric techniques. The laboratory will provide practical experience using computer applications to obtain statistics and report research findings. Fall. LEARN • APPLY • BRIDGE course.

ECON 204: Statistics for Business & Econ


ECON 204: Statistics for Business & Econ
Term: SUMMER June 6 - July 14
Instructor: Ali, M
Format: In person
Days and Times: M T W R 0900 - 1055
On Campus Location: TBD
Description: A study of descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, sampling techniques, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and time series analysis. Application of the analytical methods to a research question using the computer will be a vital component of the class. This class may be substituted for ECON 304 from earlier catalogues.

ECON 211: Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 211: Principles of Microeconomics
Term: JUN - 202240
Instructor: Chakraborty, P
Format: Online
Days and Times: M T W R 0900 - 1310
Description: Microeconomics is the study of the behavior of various economic agents, particularly consumers and producers. The course focuses upon the allocation of resources and distribution of income within competitive markets. The course provides an introduction to applied microeconomic fields such as environmental economics, international economics, labor economics, public sector economics, and industrial organization. Every semester. SOCIAL SCIENCES

PHIL 290: Black Mirror and Philosophy

PHIL 290: Black Mirror and Philosophy
Term: JUN - 202240
Instructor: Ciocchetti, C
Format: Hybrid
Days and Times: M T W R F 0900 - 1100
On Campus Location: SMB 203
Description: In this course, we will look at what technology reveals about human nature by watching Black Mirror and reading philosophy. We will reflect on the tension between love and freedom, the unrelenting march of commodification, the relationship between cruelty and morality, and how technology can dehumanize our social world. The class will develop a reasoned, deliberate approach to maintaining their integrity when it is under stress. This course addresses adult themes and presumes no prior philosophical knowledge.

ENGL 201A: The Fantastic in Literature and Film

ENGL 201A: The Fantastic in Literature and Film
JUN - 202240
Instructor: Hendricks, F
Format: In person
Days and Times: M T W R F 0900 - 1145
On Campus: JAC 304
Description: This course will examine the history of "the fantastic" in fiction and film from Greek myths to folk tales and fairy tales to gothic horror to science fiction and contemporary dark fantasy. We will discuss how these genres balance literary art, scientific and philosophical speculation, and that peculiar emotion often characterized as the “sense of wonder.” We will read representative texts from all of these genres and then delve into the themes, rhetoric, and methods of storytelling that characterize the wide range of the fantastic. A few of the many writers we'll be reading include Edgar Allan Poe, J. R. R. Tolkien, Ursula LeGuiin, and Octavia Butler. Some of the films we'll be watching include A Monster Calls, Bram Stoker's Dracula, and Stardust.

SOC 112: Social Problems

SOC 112: Social Problems
JUN - 202240
Instructor: Wolkomir, M
Format: online
Days and Times: M T W R F -

DESCRIPTION: Application of sociological theory and research to selected contemporary social problems. Emphasis is placed on the structural and interactional nature of social issues and personal troubles in an effort to define and interpret pertinent social problems. Yearly. SOCIAL SCIENCES EXPLORATIONS. LEARN • APPLY • BRIDGE course.

THEA 112A: Analysis and Criticism

THEA 112A: Analysis and Criticism
Term: JUN - 202240
Instructor: Sledge, M
Format: In person
Days and times: M T W R F - 9am- 12pm and 1pm - 3pm
On Campus Location: Marjorie Lyons Playhouse, 106
Description: Corequisite: THEA 100. An introductory study of form and technique of dramatic literature. Spring term or immersive term. HUMANITIES EXPLORATIONS

July Mini-Term Courses 2022

TREK 116: Predictably Irrational

TREK 116: Predictably Irrational
Term: JUL - 202240
Instructor: Chakraborty, P
Format: Online
Days and Times: M T W R 0900 - 1310

Description: Did you know that a person is more likely to take pencils or a stapler home from work than the equivalent amount of money in cash?

People rationalize their behavior by framing it as doing something (in this case, taking) rather than stealing. The willingness to cheat increases as people gain psychological distance from their actions. These behavioral economics principles have major consequences on how we live our lives.

This course introduces students to a growing field of economics called behavioral economics, which uses insights from psychology, political science, anthropology, management and experimental data to improve upon traditional economic models of behavior. Standard economic theory assumes that individuals are fully rational decision-makers; however, that is often not the case in the real world. Behavioral economics considers the ways that people are more social, more impulsive, less adept at using information, and more susceptible to biases than the standard economic models assume. This course gives an overview of key insights from behavioral science and identifies ways in which these findings have been used to advance policies on diversity, education, health, energy, taxation, and more.

PSY 250: Human Growth and Development

PSY 250: Human Growth and Development
Term: JUL - 202240
Instructor: Hammond, A
Format: In person
Days and Times: M T W R F 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM and 1:00 - 3:00 PM
ON CAMPUS LOCATION: CSQ 210
DESCRIPTION: A study of the aspects of human behavior that change from conception through adulthood and the processes that account for these changes. A review of the major theories set forth to explain different aspects of human development is included. Social Science CORE course for Centenary students. TREK CO 151 (service learning) corequisite (with transportation provided). This course is open to high school students by application.

TREK 151: Service-Learning: PSY 250

TREK 151: Service-Learning: PSY 250
Term: JUL - 202240
Instructor: Hammond, A

DAYS AND TIMES: M T W R F 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Campus Location: CSQ 210
Description: This is a required corequisite for PSY250. Students will participate in service learning experiences associated with the developmental content of the course. Transportation to/from service learning locations will be provided. This course is open to high school students by application.

Summer Term Courses 2022

ECON 204: Statistics for Business & Econ

ECON 204: Statistics for Business & Econ
Term: SUMMER June 6 - July 14
Instructor: Ali, M
Format: In person
Days and Times: M T W R 0900 - 1055
On Campus Location: TBD
Description: A study of descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, sampling techniques, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and time series analysis. Application of the analytical methods to a research question using the computer will be a vital component of the class. This class may be substituted for ECON 304 from earlier catalogues.

Contact Info

Dr. Karen Soul

Provost and Dean of the College

Hamilton Hall, 217

Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy The institution does not discriminate in its educational and employment policies against any person on the basis of gender, race, color, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, or on any other basis proscribed by federal, state, or local law.