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Summer School Information

Centenary College is excited to offer several summer school options for students this year!

 
Summer Terms
June mini-term: June 7-June 25
July mini-term: June 28-July 16
Summer Term: June 7-July 16
 
Summer Tuition
Centenary summer tuition is competitive at $480 per credit hour.
 
Registration
Students may register for summer courses through their faculty advisor or through the Registrar’s Office at centenary.edu/summerregistration.

Summer Courses

BIOL 251: Medical Terminology (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Anna Leal
  • Format: Online only
  • Days and times: TBD
  • Description: This course is an introduction to the vocabulary of today’s health sciences. This course is designed primarily for students intending to continue their studies in graduate allied health programs. Evaluation in this course will involve both written and oral examinations.
  • Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 202

ECON 204: Statistics for Business and Economics (4 credits)

  • Term: Summer Term (June 7-July 16)
  • Instructor: Dr. Mohammad Ali
  • Format: Hybrid. Students may choose to meet in person or may complete the course fully online.
  • Days and times: Monday through Thursday from 9:00–10:55 a.m.
  • On-campus location: Jackson Hall, Room 216
  • Description: A study of descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, sampling techniques, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and time series analysis. Application of the analytical methods to a research question using the computer will be a vital component of the class. This class may be substituted for ECON 304 from earlier catalogues.

EDUC 215: Foundations of Learning: History, Philosophy, and Pedagogy (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Terrie Johnson
  • Format: Online
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 1:00–4:00 p.m.
  • On-campus location: Centenary Square
  • Description: Whether you are coaching a children’s sports team, mentoring a high school freshman, or teaching vacation Bible school, the art and science of teaching and learning define the relationships that support each of these roles. In this course, students will explore the framework for effective coaching, teaching and mentoring. Students will examine history and philosophies of teaching and learning to begin to form sound personal philosophies and beliefs to help guide their actions in the educational arena. Social Science CORE class and Learn-Apply-Bridge (LAB) class for Centenary students.

ENGL 201: Gods and Monsters The Fantastic in Literature (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Jeff Hendricks
  • Format: Available in-person or online. This hybrid course will be taught simultaneously person-to-person and on Zoom, so students on campus as well as remote may take the class.
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 9:00–11:45 a.m.
  • On-campus location: Jackson Hall, Room 304
  • Description: This course will cover the history of "the fantastic" from Greek gods and myths to contemporary fantasy, with examples of gothic, horror, and science fiction along the way. It is appropriate for any level of college student, including entering first year students with a solid English background. Humanities CORE class for Centenary students.

GEN 201: Introduction to Sexuality Studies (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor:  Dr. Andia Augustin-Billy
  • Format: Offered in-person or online, students may choose either format.
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m.–noon
  • On-campus location: Jackson Hall, Room 105
  • Description: Where do our ideas of sexuality come from? How do people in different social groups articulate their sexuality? In what way do race, gender, age, and ability complicate one’s sexual desires and obligations? In this introductory course, we will explore the way history, society, and culture have shaped sexuality. We will study key theories and concepts within the field and apply them to various sexual behaviors, intimacies, and practices in the United States and elsewhere.

PHIL 290: Black Mirror and Philosophy (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Chris Ciocchetti
  • Format: Available in-person or online. Students may be entirely online if they choose.
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 9:00–11:00 a.m.
  • On-campus location: Smith Building, Room 101
  • Description: In this course, we will look at what technology reveals about human nature by watching Black Mirror and reading philosophy. We will reflect on the tension between love and freedom, the unrelenting march of commodification, the relationship between cruelty and morality, and how technology can dehumanize our social world. The class will develop a reasoned, deliberate approach to maintaining their integrity when it is under stress. This course addresses adult themes and presumes no prior philosophical knowledge.

MATH 102: The Art of Mathematical Thinking (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Christal Shoen
  • Format: In-person only
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 9:30–11:30 a.m. and 1:30-3:30 p.m.
  • On-campus location: Smith Building
  • Description: An introduction to mathematics emphasizing topics that are mathematically rich but accessible to non-majors. Topics of study may include geometry, dimension, fractals, different types of numbers, infinity, modular arithmetic, cryptography, counting, probability, interpreting data, and voting theory. Symbolic Reasoning CORE class and Learn-Apply-Bridge (LAB) class for Centenary students.

PSY 250: Human Growth and Development (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Amy Hammond
  • Format: In-person only
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 1:00–4:00 p.m.
  • On-campus location: Centenary Square, Room 210
  • Description: A study of the aspects of human behavior that change from conception through adulthood and the processes that account for these changes. A review of the major theories set forth to explain different aspects of human development is included. Social Science CORE course for Centenary students. No CO 151 corequisite in summer and no CO 151 credit option. This course is open to high school students by application.

PSY 304: Statistics for Behavioral Science (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Jessica Alexander
  • Format: Online
  • Days and times: TBA
  • Prerequisite: MATH 104 or higher
  • Description: Statistical analysis is a fundamental tool that scientists use to make sense of the world. In this course, students will learn to work with data, use it to make reasoned inferences, and communicate results in a professional style. The course will explore descriptive statistics, statistical inference, correlation and regression, t-tests, analysis of variance, chi-square, and nonparametric techniques. The laboratory will provide practical experience using computer applications to obtain statistics and report research findings. Social Science CORE class and Learn-Apply-Bridge (LAB) class for Centenary students.

SOC 112: Social Problems (4 credits)

  • Term: July mini term (June 28-July 16)
  • Instructor: Dr. Michelle Wolkomir
  • Format: Online only
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 10:00–11:00 a.m.
  • Description: Application of sociological theory and research to selected contemporary social problems. Emphasis is placed on the structural and interactional nature of social issues and personal troubles in an effort to define and interpret pertinent social problems. Social Science CORE course for Centenary students.

Trek 116: Challenge Aliens Among Us: Diversity and Science Fiction (4 credits)

  • Term: June mini term (June 7-June 25)
  • Instructor: Dr. Jeanne Hamming
  • Format: In-person only
  • Days and times: Monday through Friday from 9:00–11:15 a.m.
  • On-campus location: Smith Building
  • Description: One, if not the, defining characteristic of the science fiction genre, is what critic Darko Suvin calls “cognitive estrangement.” By taking the familiar, the everyday, the habitual, and re-presenting it as strange or alien, science fiction invites readers to see their own realities in a new light. In this respect, science fiction offers a valuable tool for exploring issues of diversity, not in some far-flung future world, but in our own everyday experience. In this course we will immerse ourselves in science fiction literature and film in order to “explore new worlds,” new ways of being, and new ways of understanding what it means to be human, and how we do (or should) relate to those unlike ourselves. Such topics include representations of the other and otherness, race, gender, sexuality, class, disability, immigration, and border conflicts.
Contact Info

Dr. Karen Soul

Provost and Dean of the College


Hamilton Hall, 217

Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy As To Students The institution does not discriminate in its educational and employment policies against any person on the basis of gender, race, color, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, or on any other basis proscribed by federal, state, or local law.