The chief student affairs officer will maintain and disseminate a current Student Handbook, in consultation with the duly constituted student government association, with the approval of the Provost and Dean of the College and the President’s cabinet. The Student Handbook establishes conventions and procedures for student decision-making, student conduct and discipline and student personnel matters not covered elsewhere in the Institutional Policy Manual. The chief student affairs officer will formulate a recommendation to the Provost and Dean of the College related to any student handbook additions or changes, for executive and cabinet consideration. No portion of the student handbook will limit the authority of the Board of Trustees or the authority delegated to the President by the Board.

Centenary policies related to Title IX have changed to fully comply with the latest guidance from the US Department of Education. Full copies of our policies are currently available upon request from our Title IX Coordinator, and other pages and documents on our website are in the process of being updated to reflect current polices. Please refer any questions to the Title IX Coordinator or Dean of Students.

COVID-19 Safety

Campus Social Distancing Protocols and Access by Student Type

Student Organizations, Greek Housing, and Student Gatherings and Events

Student Expectations

Housing Policies & Procedures

Community Standards

Student Conduct

Administrative Withdrawal Policy

Campus Organizations and Groups

Campus Services

Appendices

COVID-19 Safety
General Safety and Appropriate Practice

Students are expected to practice appropriate social and physical distancing practices at all times, both off and on campus. These practices and principles are outlined in the Forward Safely Promise. The Forward Safely Promise is a statement of shared principles by which all members of our community have agreed to abide. It does not serve as, nor is it intended to be, a set of conduct rules or policies. However, flagrant or repeated actions that violate the intent of the Forward Safely Promise are not permitted and may result in student conduct charges and/or immediate removal or a ban from college properties and facilities. If you have questions regarding the Forward Safely Promise, please email covid@centenary.edu. Furthermore, many aspects of the Forward Safely Promise are also reflected in the policies listed below which must be adhered to at all times.

Policies on COVID-19 safety have been added to the Student Handbook and will remain for as long as they are necessary. Due to the novel nature of this virus and the developing scientific and governmental information related to it, these policies may be changed and updated frequently. All students are responsible for reviewing these policies regularly. Wherever policies in the COVID-19 Safety section of the Student Handbook conflict with other guidelines (other than those listed in the Centenary College Catalogue or the Institutional or Administrative Policies listed in the Policies and Procedures section of the College website) or with other sections of the Student Handbook, these COVID-19 Safety policies take precedence and supersede other handbook language.

Daily Self-Checks
Students are required to monitor their own health and to perform self-checks for COVID-19 symptoms using the LiveSafe app or an alternative process provided by Centenary College. These must take place before coming onto campus and/or exiting their residence hall suite or apartment for the first time each day. Students must send an email notification to covid@centenary.edu immediately if they do not have access to a working smartphone with the LiveSafe app installed. Students may be required to show proof of completion of this self-check to enter campus buildings, including dining facilities, and to attend campus classes, events and activities. Repeated failure to perform a daily self-check may result in a referral to Student Conduct and subsequent sanctions.

Face-Coverings
Everyone over the age of 2 is required to wear a cloth mask or other approved face covering when on campus or at any activity or event sponsored by the College or a campus-affiliated group whenever they are in the company of other people. Neck fleeces/gaiters and masks with one-way valves, even if filtered, should not be worn as these may not prevent the virus from spreading from the wearer to others. Masks and other face-coverings must fit securely over your nose and under your chin and should also fit snugly around your cheeks. Mask coverage should go from the midpoint of nose to the chin, and masks must never be pulled down below the nose. Cloth face coverings are preferred, but anyone who cannot wear a mask or who would like to wear a transparent face covering while interacting with someone with a hearing or other disability that makes masked communication difficult must contact the Office of Disability Services, provide appropriate documentation, and utilize an alternative face-covering or personal protection such as a face shield.

Face-coverings are not required when alone in a personal space (such as an office, residence hall room, or car) or when outside alone and maintaining at least 20 feet of distance from any other individual. Face-coverings are not required when in a personal space with only a roommate, long-term romantic partner, or member(s) of your immediate family present.

Face-coverings may be removed during activities that are not possible while wearing a mask, such as eating or drinking, but those doing so must practice appropriate social distancing and must obey all campus regulations and guidelines for that activity. Students may dine together while in campus dining facilities or while outside, but should try to dine only with a small and consistent group of other people with whom they are already in regular close contact, such as immediate family members, roommates, or members of a shared small workout group or organization. Tables in campus dining facilities may not be moved without permission.

Illness
All students are required to stay home if they are sick or have a fever or other symptoms associated with COVID-19. Students who miss classes are expected to notify their professors directly and may be able to arrange to attend those classes remotely. All possible COVID-related illness should be reported through the LiveSafe app, by contacting the Office of Health Information, and/or by emailing covid@centenary.edu.

Physical Distancing
Students should stay six feet away from other people whenever possible, even when wearing face-coverings. When impossible or impractical, such as when in a vehicle or picking up food in the dining hall, students should minimize the amount of time spent in proximity to others as best they can.

Sports
Any sports or sporting activities on campus fields, in College facilities, or at any campus-affiliated event must be approved by the Director of Athletics and Wellness, and all sporting activities (informal, recreational, club and varsity) must comply by all safety guidelines set by the department of Athletics and Wellness.

Close Contacts
Students are strongly encouraged to minimize and keep track of the number of different people with whom they come into contact. A Close Contact is created when you are within 6 feet of another person (with or without face-coverings) for a period of 15 minutes or more OR in even a brief encounter where viral spread is likely, such as being coughed or breathed upon by a person not wearing appropriate protective equipment or close physical contact. Where contact is necessary, students are encouraged to identify a small and consistent group of people with whom to eat and be in contact. Keeping track of your contacts helps to keep that number finite and small and is also very helpful should a contact tracer need to contact you. Health department representatives and College staff members may conduct or participate in contact tracing efforts in accordance with health department recommendations, and all students are strongly urged to fully cooperate with those efforts.

Required Notification
Anyone who has been in Contact with a COVID-positive person, who is told by a physician or health department official that they must quarantine or isolate, or that they have a probably or presumptive case of COVID-19, or who received a positive COVID-19 test result must immediately notify the Health Information office by calling 318.869.5671 and/or sending an email to covid@centenary.edu.

Adherence with Laws and Guidelines
Students are required to follow all COVID-19-related state, local and federal laws and mandatory guidelines at all times on and off campus, including, but not limited to, mask ordinances and requirements.

Campus Social Distancing Protocols and Access by Student Type
Violation of the below or other campus policies may result in persons being immediately banned from all campus properties until further notice based on the ongoing public health situation. Banned students may not return to campus without written permission from a college official.

1. Residential – Students who live on campus in the residence halls.

a. May access campus resources and enter all campus facilities open to students and may participate in all student organizations and activities, both in-person and remote.
b. May take receipt of deliveries (food, groceries, etc.) but these must be left and picked up outside the residence hall.
c. May elect to live in a single room or in a double room with a roommate. Prices for single and double room options are listed in the college catalog.
d. Must socially distance, remaining 6 feet from other people whenever possible and avoiding higher risk environments and activities.
e. Will have NO non-residential visitors in their residence hall, room or suite without advance written permission from the Residence Life department. Only residential students and authorized Centenary personnel are permitted in the residence halls without prior permission.
f. May have no more than two residential student guests in a residence hall room at any time. In the Rotary Apartments, no more than 2 guests are allowed in a one-bedroom or efficiency apartment and no more than 4 guests are allowed in a 2-bedroom apartment. Everyone must wear a mask at all times when guests are present. No overnight guests are allowed in the residence halls.
g. Must perform a daily self-check for symptoms associated with COVID-19 before leaving their suite.
h. Must notify the residence hall staff immediately if they have any risk factors such as illness (coughing, fever, shortness of breath, etc.) or exposure to someone who may carry the novel coronavirus, and must also inform the Health Information office by phone at 318.869.5671 or by emailing covid@centenary.edu.

2. Commuter – Students who were approved by the Residence Life Office to live off-campus,including non-residential graduate students, students living at home and students living in approved Greek housing.

a. Are not permitted to enter the residence halls, but otherwise have the same rights and access as residential students.
b. Are asked to be particularly vigilant in their social distancing measures as outlined in the Forward Safely Promise.
c. Like other students, commuting students are required to do a daily self-check for coronavirus symptoms and are asked to stay home and isolate if ill or if they have come in contact with someone who is COVID-positive.

3. Remote – Remote students live at home and participate in classes and activities only in remote and online environments.

a. May fully participate in remote classes and student activities.
b. May not live in campus housing and may not come onto the Centenary campus without written permission from the Dean of Students or the Director of Public Safety.
c. May not participate in any in-person Centenary or Centenary student group-affiliated activities, on or off campus. Remote students may not enter Greek houses or Centenary athletic facilities.
d. Students who would like to change to or from remote status after the semester has started should contact the Director of Residence Life. Only one change to-or-from remote status is permitted.
e. The College may elect to place students on Temporary Remote Status if they are temporarily unable to or forbidden from attending class. Temporary Remote students must follow all guidelines provided to them by appropriate college officials. They have all the rights of other remote students, including participating in remote classes and activities.

4. Quarantine – Quarantine separates people who may be ill from others as a way of slowing or preventing the spread of disease. Students who have received a quarantine order from a local, state or federal official or who have been in close contact with anyone suspected of having COVID-19 must quarantine. Students who have an unexplained persistent cough, shortness of breathing, and/or a fever above 100.4 degrees OR who have two or more of the following symptoms [new and unexplained body aches, head ache, sore throat, or new olfactory or taste disorder] must notify Health Information or covid@centenary.edu and quarantine until told otherwise by a college official. Students may choose to quarantine in assigned facilities on or near campus or at home.

COVID-19 TESTING
a. All quarantining students should be tested for COVID-19. The health information office can help students locate free or low-cost testing locations in the area.

DURATION FOR QUARANTINE
b. Students with COVID-19 symptoms but no fever and no known exposure to a COVID-positive person must remain in quarantine for 14 days, OR until they can document a negative COVID-19 test result taken at least two days after symptoms developed.
c. Students who test negative for COVID-19 but have symptoms including a fever of 100.4 or higher must quarantine until they have been fever-free for at least one day (while not taking fever-reducing medication) before leaving quarantine.
d. Students who were in Close Contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19 must quarantine for 14 days from the last contact

1. REDUCED QUARANTINE – Asymptomatic students who submit a negative PCR (not rapid) test result from a test administered at least 5 days after the last Close Contact may reduce their quarantine length to 10 days. From release time through the end of the standard 14-day quarantine period, the student MUST monitor their temperature and symptoms and submit them through the LiveSafe app or via the covid@centenary.edu email address, may not be unmasked within 6 feet of anyone other than their roommate (including meal times and athletic practices), and may not participate in higher-risk activities that involve close contact with others. Violations of the reduced quarantine policy may result in immediate removal from campus.

ON-CAMPUS QUARANTINE CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS
e. May not enter other bedrooms and may not leave the suite or house (except in emergencies or responding to a fire alarm) or give items to others without permission of the Director of Residence Life. Permission will generally be granted only to receive medical treatment or testing, and this should be coordinated with the Director of Residence Life. Quarantined students may not use laundry facilities or enter hallways or public areas of the residence halls and may not go outside.
f. May not be in the suite hallway or restroom while other people are present. Should wash hands immediately upon entering and leaving the suite restroom and should sanitize each surface they touch. Cleaning supplies for this purpose are available from Facilities Services upon request.
g. May not allow anyone other than essential college staff to enter their suite;
h. May order Cafeteria meals to be delivered. These students will be able to access the cafeteria menu through the Bite app and may order using the contact instructions provided by Dining Services. Meals must be ordered no later than 11pm the previous night. 
i. May order groceries, meals, or other items. If they have an outside entrance (off-campus houses and some Rotary apartments) these may be delivered in a contact-free manner. Students in residence halls can coordinate with residence life staff to have items delivered outside the hall and then brought to their room by the staff member on duty.
j. Must take and report their temperature twice per day. If they do not have a thermometer, we will make arrangements for them to obtain one.
k. Any student who violates these restrictions will be asked to leave campus facilities immediately.

5. Isolation – Students who are ill are isolated from others to avoid infecting other students. Any student who has been classified as a probably or presumptive case of COVID-19 by a physician or health department or who has tested positive for the novel coronavirus must notify the Director of Residence Life immediately and will be relocated to isolation facilities on or off campus; students may also choose to isolate off campus or at home if they can do so safely. These students:

a. Must remain isolated for 10 days from the positive test or development of symptoms AND must be in good health and fever-free while not taking medication for at least 24 hours proximate to the end of isolation.
b. May not enter other bedrooms and may not leave the suite or house (except in emergencies or responding to a fire alarm) or give items to others without permission of the Director of Residence Life. Permission will generally be granted only to receive medical treatment or testing, and this should be coordinated with the Director of Residence Life. Quarantined students may not use laundry facilities or enter hallways or public areas of the residence halls and may not go outside.
c. May not be in the suite hallway or restroom while other people are present. Should wash hands immediately upon entering and leaving the suite restroom and should sanitize each surface they touch. Cleaning supplies for this purpose are available from Facilities Services upon request.
d. May not allow anyone other than essential college staff to enter their suite;
e. May order Cafeteria meals to be delivered. These students will be able to access the cafeteria menu through the Bite app and may order using the contact instructions provided by Dining Services. Meals must be ordered no later than 11pm the previous night. 
f. May order groceries, meals, or other items. If they have an outside entrance (off-campus houses and some Rotary apartments) these may be delivered in a contact-free manner. Students in residence halls can coordinate with residence life staff to have items delivered outside the hall and then brought to their room by the staff member on duty.
g. Must take and report their temperature starting at least 24 hours before the end of the isolation period. If they do not have a thermometer, we will make arrangements for them to obtain one.
h. Any student who violates these restrictions will be asked to leave campus facilities immediately.

Student Organizations, Greek Housing, and Student Gatherings and Events
Off-Campus Meetings and Events
Student organizations are forbidden to hold off-campus meetings or events with 10 or more people in attendance unless they obtain specific prior written permission from the Director of Student Involvement or the Dean of Students. This includes formal and informal, official and non-official, and spontaneous or unplanned gatherings. If 25% of the current members of an organization OR 10 people (whichever is fewer) are present at an off-campus party or event, that organization may be held responsible even if the event was not planned or sanctioned by the leadership of that organization. This is in addition to any individual conduct charges. Larger student organizations are encouraged to meet on campus with appropriate distancing in place and/or to meet remotely or in a hybrid format with some participating in person and others remotely.

On-Campus and Pre-Approved Meetings and Events
Student gatherings, meetings, program, and events may take place provided that they are held on campus in a space properly reserved for that purpose. Face-coverings are required at all times. Food and drinks should not be served during campus meetings or events unless they are outside with plenty of room to physically distance or with advance written permission from an appropriate College official. RA programs must be approved by a member of the Residence Life Central Staff. All student organization events and meetings should be entered in the Engage online Events system and rooms, facilities, and outdoor areas such as fields, tents, or the Bandshell must be properly reserved using the online reservation calendar or through the campus Conference and Events Coordinator. Organizations must limit the number of people in attendance to the seating maximum assigned to that space or set by the appropriate college official. Seating at meetings and seated events must be spread out so that all attendees sit at least 6 feet apart. Appropriate physical distancing must be enforced so that people minimize the amount of time they are within 6 feet of others.

Greek Houses and Other Campus-Owned or Affiliated Housing
Just as residence halls are currently restricted to residential students, Greek Houses may only be entered by current residents of that house, active members of that chapter, the primary chapter advisor, and authorized college employees. Exceptions to this policy require prior written approval from the Director of Student Involvement or the Dean of Students. Note that students currently residing in a fraternity house are considered commuter students and are not permitted to enter any college residence hall without prior written permission from the Director or Assistant Director of Residence Life. Residents of houses owned by the College and operated by the Department of Residence Life are considered residential students.

No more than 9 people are permitted inside any Greek house at a time without prior written permission from the Director of Student Involvement or Dean of Students. Face-coverings must be worn by all parties any time a person who does not currently reside in that house is present. Residents of the house are not required to wear face-coverings when alone in their personal room or when only current residents of that house are present.

Fraternal organizations are allowed to have guests in outdoor areas such as yards and porches, provided that face-coverings are worn at all time, appropriate physical distancing is in place, and the total number of people on the property (inside and out) does not exceed 9 people at a time. Off-campus outdoor events of 10 people or larger (including those on Greek house property) require prior approval.

No one other than current residents, approved College personnel, and College-approved contract workers is allowed to enter student-occupied College-owned housing.

Recognized fraternal and other student organizations are allowed and encouraged to reserve spaces on campus for meetings and events.

Contacts During Student Organization Meetings or Events
Student organizations should work to ensure that no Contacts are created during any meeting or event. If any new contacts are created during an event sponsored by any campus organization, the nature of those contacts and the names of each of the students involved must be submitted to the Director of Student Involvement via email within 24-hours of the event. Failure to do so may result in organizational conduct charges and/or withdrawal of permission to operate at Centenary. Continued contact by people who are already in regular contact with each other does not need to be reported. For example, contacts confirmed to be only between roommates, long-term romantic partners, or members of a small workout group or organization who are already in regular contact with each other prior to attending the event do not need to be reported. Organizations will not be penalized or disciplined for contacts that occur during their events provided that they are self-reported promptly, do not happen repeatedly and that the organizers of the event make a good-faith effort to enforce appropriate campus guidelines.

Events and Parties involving Alcohol
Parties and other large gatherings involving the consumption of alcohol or the ingestion of other drugs pose a grave risk to the safety of the campus. Face-coverings must be removed to drink, and consumption of alcohol or other drugs can lead to impaired decision-making and poor choices, which increases the likelihood of risky behaviors that could spread COVID-19. Requests to serve alcohol at student events or registered parties, on or off campus, will be denied until the risk of COVID-19 is greatly reduced.

Students are forbidden to attend parties of 10 or more people where alcohol is being consumed and are encouraged to avoid bars and other large social gatherings. If 25% of the current members of an organization OR 10 people (whichever is fewer) are present at an unapproved on-or-off-campus party or event involving alcohol, that organization may be held responsible even if the event was not planned or sanctioned by the leadership of that organization. This is in addition to any individual student conduct charges.

Student Expectations
What It Means to be a Centenary Student

Centenary College has a long history of excellence in both academics and in student engagement. Each student enrolled at Centenary is expected to represent themselves and the College in a manner which characterizes respect, compassion and dignity. Community standards have been and will continue to be set with input from student body. These standards are in place so students will be challenged educationally, socially, and developmentally to meet the expectations of society. In addition, these standards are instilled with a respect for the moral and intellectual stature of student members of Centenary’s academic and residential community.

All students at Centenary are responsible for all community standards and policies set forth in the Student Handbook. It will be understood by the administration that each student has read the handbook and understands the policies and procedures outlined. Alleged non-academic community violations or misconduct will be considered disciplinary matters, which will be addressed by Student Conduct processes and will result in appropriate sanctioning, if applicable. In addition, students allegedly involved in criminal behavior on or off the campus may face immediate suspension from the College. Any behavior that is determined to be a threat to the community or conflicts with the academic mission or vision statement of the college can also result in sanctioning or dismissal.

Good citizenship is a character trait that will follow each student into society and manifest itself into both the rights and responsibilities of the individual as well as the community. The Division of Student Development will support and challenge each student to aspire to such manifestations while encouraging students to hold both their peers and themselves accountable to our community standards.

Equal Opportunity Statement
Centenary College is an equal opportunity educational institution. The College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, religion, gender, age, marital status, disability, or sexual orientation, in the administration of its educational policies, recruitment or admission of students, scholarship, grant or loan programs, athletic or other College-administered programs, employment procedures, training programs, promotion policies or other related personnel practices.

Gender Expression
Students may inquire at the Office of the Registrar for information about changing their name and salutation in accordance with their legal and/or preferred name and their gender identity

Compliance
This handbook is made available to all students in electronic format and notifications within this handbook serve as official notifications to students as required by law. The College’s designated coordinator for compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Internal Revenue Service is the Vice President for Finance and Administration. The College's designated coordinator for compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Educational Amendment of 1972 and the Internal Revenue Service is David Orr,Director of Athletics and Recreation. The College fully complies with NCAA Division III policies and all relevant state and federal statues including the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (1974).


 

Housing Policies & Procedures

Centenary College of Louisiana is a selective, residential national liberal arts college. Living on campus is an integral part of the Centenary experience. In order to insure an integrated and coherent living and learning educational environment and experience, all students must live in one of the College's residence halls and purchase a full meal plan during any semester for which the student is enrolled in nine or more semester credit hours unless that student is approved for a room and/or meal exception. Fall Semester includes August Term and Fall Term. Spring Semester includes Spring Term and May Term. After completing 30 semester credit hours at Centenary, a student may apply to live in Greek housing. Campus housing includes residential buildings which are maintained, operated, and staffed by the College, used for student living, and managed by Residence Life staff. These do not include Greek housing. Housing status and exceptions are determined and communicated to students solely by written communication from the Office of Residence Life. Meal plan exceptions may be communicated by the Vice-President for Finance and Administration or designee, or by the Office of Residence Life. The type or absence of a housing or meal plan bill and/or communications from other offices are not intended to imply compliance with or an exemption from housing policies or housing and meal requirements.

Off-Campus Residential Exceptions

Exceptions for Non-Traditional Students

Students who are married, parents, or over the age of 23 on the first day of the fall semester may choose to live off campus provided submit an off-campus request form with accurate local address and contact information each year they want to live off campus. If students who are married, parents, or over the age of 23 are approved to live off campus, they are not required to purchase a meal plan. The Office of Student Development must be updated on any address changes within two weeks of the change of address.

Exceptions for Greek Housing

To receive an exception to live in approved Greek housing, each student wishing to live off campus in the Greek house must submit an off-campus request form and complete roster of all students authorized by the chapter to live in that house during the applicable semester. This roster must be signed by the chapter president or house manager, who must also turn in a rooming diagram indicating where each student will live. Those approved for Greek housing must purchase a meal plan for which they qualify. To be allowed to house undergraduate students, the Greek house much remain in good standing with the college and must maintain clean and safe facilities, including working smoke detectors. If the fraternity falls out of good status with the college during the school year, all students residing in that house who are not otherwise eligible to live off campus will be required to move on campus and will pay a pro-rated cost to cover the remainder of the academic year.

Exceptions for Local Commuter Students
Local students who qualified for a full room waiver for their first semester at Centenary due to living in the 711xx or 710xx zip code area may choose to live off campus at the home of a local parent or legal guardian, provided that the student and their parent or guardian continue to live in a 711xx or 710xx zip code area. All students who qualify for this local exception to the housing requirement must purchase a full or commuter meal plan, must live off campus with a parent or legal guardian, and must correctly state that parent or guardian’s address on their housing application. If a student is found to be living in a residence other than that of a parent or legal guardian, the student will automatically be responsible for the full price of a room and a full meal plan.

Exception Procedures

All exception requests must be submitted in writing to the Office of Residence Life at least two weeks prior to the date of Room Selection for the applicable fall semester. Requests for spring semester exceptions must be received prior to Thanksgiving Break. Incoming students must submit exception requests prior to the deadline listed in their new student housing mailings. Approved exceptions after this deadline will be charged a $300 late application fee. Once the semester has begun, room fees are not refundable for any reason.

Students who wish to submit a residential exception request to live off campus for a reason other than those listed previously must complete the Off-Campus Request form and should attach a letter and other supporting documentation explaining their unique situation. Financial need is not considered in housing exception decisions.

Housing Exception Appeals

If a request to live off campus is not approved; the student may appeal. Each appeal of a housing decision must be made individually by the student involved and will be directed to the Assistant Director of Residence Life in charge of housing assignments. Residence Life may authorize other exceptions if approved by the Director of Residence Life and the designated representative from the Business Office. Housing appeals shall be directed to the Exception Review Committee.

Meal Plans Requirements, Exceptions and Appeals
All students are required to purchase an approved full meal plan unless they receive an approved exception. Students who live in Greek housing or have a housing accommodation of any kind for on or off campus living are required to purchase a full meal plans unless also approved for a meal plan exception. Local commuter students are required to purchase either a full or commuter meal plan. Requests to change from one meal plan to another may be submitted to the Office of Residence Life no later than the first week of each semester. Requests for meal plan exceptions must be submitted using the appropriate form on the Centenary Dining Services website. The Director of Dining Services may approve exceptions as authorized by the Vice President for Finance and Administration. Appeals shall be directed to the Exception Review Committee.

Exception Review Committee
The committee membership consists of one faculty or staff member appointed by the Provost, one staff member from the Student Development professional staff appointed by the Dean of Students, and two residential students appointed by RHA. Alternates for each position may also be appointed at the discretion of the appointing officers listed above. The committee will be chaired by the Director of Residence Life, who will serve as a non-voting member. Appeal requests must be submitted in writing prior to the first day of the semester and within three weeks of receiving the initial exception request notification or rejection. The decision of the Exception Review Committee is final, so students should be sure to submit any and all information they would like to be considered as part of their appeal before the appeal decision is made. Students may not appeal or resubmit a housing or meal exception more than once per academic year.

Disability and Other Medical Accommodations Related to Meals or Housing
Students who need special medical or disability accommodations related to their meal plan or residence must submit a medical accommodation request prior to the exception deadline or within two weeks of the diagnosis of a new condition using the online form or forms provided for that purpose. All medical requests require that a physician or other appropriate medical provider fully complete the appropriate medical accommodation form provided by the college before the request can be reviewed. Letters and supporting documentation are allowed and considered, but these must be supplemental to the completed college medical accommodation form. Medical and dietary needs will be accommodated on campus wherever possible at the discretion of the college. Housing and meal accommodations are considered independently, and students who receive housing accommodations are still required to purchase a full meal plan unless they have an approved dietary accommodation that states otherwise. Centenary fully complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Assignments
The returning student housing Room Request process for the upcoming year takes place each spring semester. Students have the right to select their roommates through mutual request and to request their preference of housing assignments. Requests will be ranked based on credit hours earned, disciplinary record, and academic achievement (GPA). Rooms and buildings may be reserved and therefore unavailable for assignment at the discretion of the Director of Residence Life. Details and additional information will be sent to each resident prior to the Room Request event via campus mail or email and will be available in the Office of Residence Life. The assignment information will include directions for the placement process including dates and times that students will be expected to submit a housing request. Failure to follow the listed procedures may result in a loss of the rights mentioned above. Students are encouraged to sign up for housing together as roommates, suitemates, or apartment-mates. When one’s roommate or another member of the group that signed up for housing together withdraws from the group for any reason (e.g.: not returning to Centenary, moving off campus, living with other friends on campus, etc.) prior to the start of the term, students in the group may be reassigned to different rooms or may have other students placed with them.. Students without roommates for any reason may be assigned a roommate at any time. Students who neither participate in the housing assignment process nor receive approval to live off campus will be charged for a room and full meal plan and may make a room request by contacting the Office of Residence Life.

Room Fee Reduction and Waivers
Centenary values the community and educational experiences that come from living in college residence halls, so may in some cases waive or reduce the cost of campus housing for exceptional, needy, or local students. Such students who are assigned to residence hall rooms are required to reside in their assigned rooms. Local commuter students are expected to live at the address submitted to the housing office on their exception request form. Students who are assigned rooms on campus but who physically reside off campus regularly or for a significant period of time and students with a local housing exception who do not live full-time with their parent or guardian at the address listed on their form may become ineligible to receive housing fee waivers or other institutional aid fully or partially covering housing costs and may be required to pay the cost of housing for that entire academic year and future years.

Single Rooms
Students requesting a single room assignment will be ranked according to the room request criteria. Single room assignments may not be available, and the Department of Residence Life reserves the rights to place a roommate into an assigned single room at any time. When there are empty rooms in the residential buildings, they may be assigned as private rooms at a higher cost. However, single occupancy is not guaranteed to any student at any time. Single occupancy applicants may be reviewed by the Director of Residence Life and granted only in conditions where space is available, and the student is in good disciplinary standing with the College. No furniture, including mattresses or extra furniture due to the singling of a double room, may be removed by residents.

Housing Contract
Students will be given a room contract which must be signed and returned or electronically submitted to the Office of Residence Life within the stated period of time. Students who do not turn in their contracts on time may lose their place in the rank order of room requests being granted. All housing policies and procedures listed in the Student Handbook are a part of the housing contract and therefore any violation of such policies may be considered a violation of that contract.

Roommate Agreements
Living on campus provides each student the opportunity to live with a variety of people and experience many different lifestyles. Residence Life staff members are responsible for helping to create a positive living environment that begins in the room and extends to the suite, floor, building, and campus. By using the Roommate Agreement (aka: Roommate Contract), honest communication is encouraged between roommates. Similarly, an agreement between or among suitemates residents of an apartment can be beneficial for all parties. Agreement forms will be available from and collected and reviewed by Resident Assistants (RAs). RAs can be helpful when parties experience difficulty in reaching agreement. The completed agreement will be a source of referral as students live in the community. The Agreement is critical as it will be the foundation for any mediation that the RA or other Residence Life staff will facilitate, should problems emerge in the room, suite, or apartment. All students are encouraged to complete an Agreement. First year students and their roommates are required to complete an Agreements by the end of the second week of the fall semester or by the end of the second week of becoming roommates at other times of the year. Every student is expected to comply with the terms of any such Agreement to which the student is a party.

Room Changes
A room change request or conflict is an opportunity for dialogue and mediation. Students are expected to attempt to settle their differences and continue to live together in a respectful manner. A housing “freeze” occurs during each term (i.e.: August Term, Fall Term, Spring Term, and May Term). Requests for changes of room or roommate may not be considered two weeks after the beginning of each term. All change requests require the approval of the Assistant Director of Residence Life who manages housing assignments, which generally will come only after attempted mediation by the Resident Assistant. A $25 room change fee will be assessed to each student making a voluntary room change. In addition, the Director of Residence Life and the Dean of Students have the authority to initiate, at their discretion, revocation of housing contracts, relocation of housing assignments and/or other appropriate disciplinary action should a situation call for such attention. Students assigned to double rooms who end up without roommates will enter a room consolidation process. During this process students may have a new roommate placed with them or may be reassigned to a different room. The room change fee will be waived for students moving into paid singles and for students involved in the consolidation process.

Consolidation
Students at times may have to go through a process of consolidation when they are left without a roommate (e.g.: roommate withdraws, graduates, transfers, moves in with another friend). At such a point the student may have the option to upgrade the room to a single or have the opportunity to move in with another student who is on the consolidation list. Students will be notified at the beginning of the consolidation period of their options and given a deadline of two (2) weeks to make a decision. If the student does not take sufficient action to resolve their situation, the Office of Residence Life may charge them for a single room and/or reassign them to a different room. Students left temporarily without a roommate must leave one half of the room empty (e.g.: the furniture, contiguous wall space, and closet space), as another roommate may be assigned at any time. Students found to be using more than their half of the room may be charged the single room price for the entire semester.

Closing Procedures
Residential buildings officially close at the conclusion of each academic semester and during academic breaks of at least one week, as designated in the official College Calendar. All students are expected to vacate the buildings at these times and will not have access to their room or belongings within unless approved for break housing. Break housing is available to approved students for $20 per day or a flat rate of $75 for a week-long break, such as Spring Break or $150 for a longer break such as Christmas/Winter Break. Before leaving for a break, students must conform to the health and safety as well as other break and closing guidelines. Suite and room doors and windows must be closed and locked, all appliances and electrical items other than fish tanks must be unplugged, and lights must be turned off. Students who wish to leave any other items plugged in may appeal to the Director of Residence Life. If there is reasonable cause to believe that a resident has violated any housing policy or community standard during any break period, the student may be required to immediately vacate pending a hearing. Students not approved to stay during a break will be allowed to re-enter the buildings when they re-open.

Immersion Term
During the semesters, as opposed to the Summer, campus living and campus dining are designed to serve students enrolled in active courses and in the case of dining, local courses. During the August and May Immersion Terms, students may be assigned to rooms other than those to which they are assigned during the Fall and Spring Terms. Students must be enrolled in an immersion term course to live on campus and/or use the meal plan during that term. Students who are not enrolled in an active course are not entitled to live on campus or use a meal plan. Space permitting, requests will be considered by the Office of Residence Life from those students who are not enrolled in immersion term classes, but who wish to pay additionally to live on campus during an immersion term at Summer Housing rate.

Summer Housing
Summer Housing may be available at an additional fee to students (and new alumni on a space-available basis) who were enrolled in the previous spring semester and/or who are enrolled in the following fall semester. A student does not need to be enrolled in May, August or Summer classes. Students who are not currently enrolled in classes at Centenary will be charged the summer housing rate for each day they reside on campus or store belongings during the May or August term. Summer Housing fees vary by length of stay and type of room. For information about Summer Housing, contact the Director of Residence Life. Summer Housing space is limited and is not guaranteed.

Vacating a Room
When moving to a new room on campus, students are required to check out of their old room no more than 48 hours after checking into the new room, and must schedule the check-out time with the RA at least 48 hours in advance. When moving out completely (e.g.: at the end of the academic year), students must either set up a checkout time with their Resident Assistant at least 48 hours prior to checking out or complete the express check out forms provided during move out. When students check out of a room, all of their belongings must be out of the room and their area of the room must be clean and ready for future occupancy. When the last occupant of a room checks out, the beds must be fully assembled and may not be bunked, lofted, or raised above the fifth-highest peg setting, and the room, shared suite or apartment areas, including bathroom and hallway outside the suite, must be clean. Failure to follow these procedures will result in improper checkout fees. If leaving before the end of the school year, the parking pass, if any, should be turned in with the room key.

 

Safety and Health Measures
Room Inspections and Entry
All students have the right to privacy in their rooms. However, on occasion the Residence Life staff and/or other College officials are authorized to enter residents’ rooms. Staff members may do so to respond to perceived emergency situations, public nuisance situations (a ringing alarm or odor that is disturbing others), to enforce policies, to confirm evacuation during a fire alarm or drill, to perform maintenance or facility observations or repairs, and to perform routine health and safety inspections. Suite hallways and bathrooms are considered public areas and may be entered or searched at any time. All areas, including bedrooms, may be entered by staff members during performance of their duties. Students’ belongings will not be moved (other than is necessary to ensure safety and to perform necessary maintenance or health and safety functions) or searched (other than a “plain view” visual check of rooms and closets) without a letter signed by the Dean of Students, a search warrant issued by the court system or by the Director of Public Safety, or the permission of a resident of that room. Search warrants issued by College officials will specify the reason for the search. If the resident is available at the time of the search, the resident may be present during the search. The Residence Life staff may, after providing notification at least 48 hours in advance, check a room at any time for health, safety, or maintenance reasons. Safety or policy violations observed during these inspections will be referred through the appropriate channels.

Fire Alarms and Safety Equipment
It is against the law and the regulations of the College to tamper with fire equipment of any kind. Falsely pulled fire alarms and other forms of tampering with fire equipment are a serious safety issue and each student should accept personal responsibility for reporting anyone who does so. Students found responsible for false alarms or other fire equipment tampering will face serious sanctions up to removal from housing or expulsion and may also face criminal charges. All students are required to evacuate buildings during fire alarms and may not re-enter until cleared by a Residence Life or DPS staff member. Students who do not evacuate during fire alarms or drills may be fined, issued a citation, and/or face Student Conduct sanctions.

Fire Safety Regulations
The burning of any substance (other than cigarettes in approved outdoor smoking areas) is not allowed in or around the residential buildings. Candles and incense may not be burned, and partially burned candles and/or incense are not allowed in the residential buildings. Multiple socket plugs are only allowed if they have built-in surge protectors and even then should not have multiple high drain appliances in use simultaneously. Students in areas where circuit breakers need to be reset may be required to reduce their number of items plugged in to conform to the capacity of the electrical system. Appliances with exposed heating elements or hot surfaces (including but not limited to toaster ovens, electric grills or skillets, halogen lights, fryers, and space heaters) are not allowed in the residence halls. Students may have one microwave (no more than 900 watts) and one refrigerator (no more than 1.8 amps) per bedroom. Irons and coffee pots are allowed but may not be left plugged in or unattended. Window air conditioning units are allowed only with prior written approval from the Director of Residence Life and Director of Facilities Services.

Rotary Apartments
Students living in Rotary Apartments may use the provided appliances and may bring and use a toaster (but not toaster oven) in the kitchen. The oven, microwave, and toaster may not be left unattended while cooking. No one may deep fry or do any other type of grease-laden cooking. Use of personal non-electric grills is permitted on the Rotary patio at least 20 feet away from the building. Flammable supplies (e.g. propane, coals, lighter fluid) may not be stored in the apartments at any time.

Health Issues and Missed Classes
Students’ rooms and bathrooms should be kept reasonably clean and trash should be emptied as needed. Uncovered food and spills that are not cleaned up are considered health hazards and are not allowed. Students should report illness to their Resident Assistant and the office of Health Information. Students missing classes should notify their professors directly.

Roof and Maintenance Areas
Equipment or maintenance rooms and the roof areas of all buildings and porches are off limits to all except those authorized for inspection, repair, or work reasons except in areas designated and posted by the College.

Keys, IDs, Doors, and Lockouts
Students are responsible for all keys issued to them. Students whose keys are lost or stolen will be charged a fee to cover costs associated with creating new keys, changing locks, and printing new student IDs. Lost keys and IDs should be reported within 24 hours in order to maintain the safety and security of residential and other facilities. Students moving to a different room on campus will have a set timeframe in which to switch out their old key for their new key. For each day over the announced timeframe, a charge of $5 per day will be assess until the old key is returned and new key picked up, up until 10 days at which point an additional $50 will be charged to change the locks for the old key. Students are responsible for knowing and abiding by all key return policies listed on the Department of Public Safety Website. Any keys not properly turned in upon checkout or the end of a term may result in them being treated as “Lost or Stolen Keys” and those students will be charged accordingly. All keys and ID cards issued remain the property of Centenary College. Keys and ID cards must be returned to the institution or provided to college staff upon request and may not be lent to persons who are not approved for access to that specific lock or facility. Students, including student staff of any kind, who improperly lend, give away, or duplicate keys or ID cards may be charged with the costs associated with changing those locks and may also face employment and/or Student Conduct sanctions.

Students should carry their ID and room key at all times. If you lock yourself out of your room between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., contact your RA or another RA in your building. If none of the RAs are available, you may call the Department of Public Safety. Between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. contact the RA on duty if you need to be admitted to your room. The first two times a student needs a door unlocked it is considered a courtesy. Upon the third key-in and each one thereafter a fine of $5.00 will be posted to the student’s account.

Students are advised to always lock their door to their room and to never allow someone that they do not know into a residential building. It is against college regulations to prop open a locked door or fire door, except during structured approved events, such as move in day. Propped exterior residence hall doors are a serious safety concern, and students seen propping these doors may be issued a campus citation by the Department of Public Safety and/or face Student Conduct charges. The minimum fine for propping open an exterior door shall be $100.00.

Room Decorations and Furnishings
No furniture, including mattresses or extra furniture due to the singling of a double room, may be removed from the room without written permission from the Office of Residence Life. College furniture may not be physically altered in any way. Decals and stickers should not be applied to College property. Decorations visible from public areas must be in good taste. Residents may decorate their room or suite doors but are responsible for any damages to those surfaces.

Data and Cable Service
The residence hall rooms are equipped with data ports and/or Wi-Fi internet connections. Each residence hall room is properly equipped for television cable service. The televisions in the lounges are available for residential student use but should not be used to publicly view copyrighted materials without proper authorization.

Theft and Property Damage
The College is not responsible for the theft or damage of personal property in residence hall rooms or elsewhere on College property, even if that damage was caused by water leakage, fire, electrical surge, or other mechanical problem or defect. All students are strongly encouraged to obtain insurance coverage for their belongings. Students should report theft and vandalism to their RA and the Department of Public Safety. Prompt reporting is an important factor in recovering stolen items.

Pets
Other than approved service or support animals allowed by law, approved animals used for research in suitable facilities in academic buildings, and fish which live exclusively under water kept in an aquarium no larger than 15 gallons in the residential buildings, students may not have pets or other animals inside any campus facility, even to visit for a moment. Fish should be kept in the aquarium at all times. Fish owners and keepers of approved service or support animals are responsible for cleaning up after and caring for their animals and will have to remove them from the building immediately if there are offensive odors, excessive noise, or possible allergy issues. Because some students may be permitted to have an approved service or support animal and because faculty and staff are allowed to have pets, students with pet allergies should inform the Residence Life professional staff member for their building and the office of Health Information and Disability Services.

Weight Lifting Equipment
Barbells, weightlifting equipment, and dumbbells weighing over 5 lbs. each are not allowed in the residential buildings. Weight equipment is available in the Centenary Fitness Center.

Sports and Activities in Residential Facilities
Sports of any type are prohibited in the residence halls, including all activities that could cause injury or property damage. Water guns and balloons may not be used in the residence halls.

Escort and Guest Policies
Guests who do not work at or attend Centenary College must always be escorted while in any area of a residential building other than the main lobby by a host who has approved access to that building. Students are responsible for the behavior of their guests even if the host is not present and may be held accountable in for their actions Student Conduct proceedings. Letting someone into the building who does not live in that building, even if you know them, requires that you take responsibility for them and their actions as your guest.

Common Areas
Students are allowed to have guests in the lobby and main lounge at any time. Sleeping is prohibited in any common area of the residence hall (e.g.: study rooms, lounges, hallways, etc.). Residents who use kitchen facilities are responsible for cleaning those areas after use. Residence may not leave unattended items in kitchens or laundry rooms except during customary use.

Guests in Rooms
Students may host guests (e.g.: fellow Centenary students or others) in their rooms with permission of the host’s roommate and per the rules outlined in the Student Handbook. Every overnight guest who is not a Centenary student living on campus must be registered with the Office of Residence Life using the Overnight Guest Form. Guests may stay on campus for no more than three (3) consecutive nights. A guest may not stay on campus more than a total of ten (10) nights per semester, even if hosted by different students. Exceptions must be approved in writing by both the Director of Residence Life and the host’s roommate.

Quiet Hours & Courtesy Hours
Quiet Hours are in effect from 9:00 p.m. to 9:00 a.m. each weeknight and from midnight to 10:00 a.m. on weekends. Hall Councils may modify the quiet hours of their buildings subject to approval by the Director of Residence Life. Courtesy hours are in effect at all times, and students must reduce excessive noise that disturbs others. Students who are inconvenienced by noise should make a request to the offenders. If noise continues, students should report it to a Resident Assistant immediately. Residential Buildings will observe 24-hour quiet time beginning at 9:00 a.m. the day before Finals Week. RHA (Residence Halls Association) and/or Hall Councils may approve a lifting of the quiet hours for a maximum of two (2) hours each day. Designated hours will be posted in each residential building if different from those described here. A student who violates these quiet hours is subject Student Conduct processes and may also be charged a minimum $50.00 fine per incident or the equivalent in service hours to the college. The final exam week quiet hours extend through the last scheduled final exam.

Meeting Attendance and Fines
Residential students are required to pay residential building, floor, or other area dues or fines on time and to attend all scheduled hall and floor meetings unless they have prior approval from a Residence Life official.


 

Community Standards

As a community there are certain standards that must be observed to provide an atmosphere conducive to learning. Each student is responsible to the community for upholding all standards and policies listed in the Student Handbook.

Alcoholic Beverages and Other Drugs
According to Louisiana law, it is unlawful for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase or have public possession of any alcoholic beverage. It is also unlawful to furnish alcohol to someone under 21 or obviously inebriated. Centenary College will impose disciplinary sanctions on students found in violation of these laws on school property or during any school activity. Students may also face criminal prosecution. Use, possession, or distribution of alcoholic beverages in or on the Centenary College Campus, regardless of a person’s age, is prohibited by College policy unless it takes place as part of an approved Campus Event where alcohol is authorized or is permitted by the Rotary Apartments Alcohol Policy (see below). All events sponsored by campus organizations, on or off campus, must comply with the guidelines established by the Office of Student Involvement and the Board of Trustees.

Centenary College students are expected to comply with city, state and federal laws regarding controlled dangerous substances. Consequently, individuals found using, possessing or distributing controlled dangerous substances, except as expressly permitted by law, will face disciplinary action and possible arrest, imprisonment or fines. Louisiana law provides for increased penalties for individuals convicted of felony possession or distribution of drugs to students and/or on school grounds including Centenary College property.

Centenary College guarantees procedural fairness in disciplinary proceedings to any student accused of violating alcohol or other drug policies or laws through an administrative hearing and/or referral to the Conduct Review Committee. For the purposes of campus judicial proceedings, possession is defined as being present in a room or area where there are drugs, alcohol or paraphernalia. Students with alcohol, drugs or paraphernalia in their assigned residence hall room, in their car, or among their possessions are also considered to be in possession. Students found responsible for violating these policies may face a range of sanctions including required educational activities, service to the campus or community, removal from housing, suspension, expulsion and referral for criminal prosecution.

A brief overview of city, state and federal laws regarding the use of alcohol and illicit drugs may be found in Appendices to the Student Handbook of the Student Handbook. Information regarding the health risks associated with the use of alcohol and illicit drugs may also be found in the Appendices. The section of the Student Handbook entitled "Resources for Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Sexual Assault" provides a list of educational, counseling and treatment programs available to the College Community. The Centenary College Counseling Center will provide free confidential counseling for any student who is concerned about his or her drug or alcohol use. The Counseling Center is located in Rotary Hall and the phone number is 869-5466.

Rotary Alcohol Policy

Alcohol is strictly prohibited in all residence halls with the exception of faculty or staff occupied apartments, suites, or rooms and Rotary apartments in which each resident of the suite agrees to the provisions listed below. Those who meet these qualifications must also receive approval from the Office of Residence Life, which will determine if each resident meets the outlined standards.

  1. All residents of the apartment must be 21 years old or older.
  2. Any consumption of alcohol must remain entirely within the suite.
  3. No person under the age of 21 may be present while the serving or consumption of alcohol takes place. If persons under the age of 21 are found present in the suite during the serving or consumption of alcohol, everyone present, regardless of age, will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action. Empty cans or bottles will be considered signs of consumption.
  4. Only beer, wine or other beverages with label strength of 18% alcohol by volume or less are permitted.
  5. No kegs or other bulk containers of alcohol are allowed (e.g. pitchers, buckets, jugs).
  6. The procurement and consumption of all alcohol should be done in a discreet manner. No public display of alcohol or alcoholic beverages is allowed. The transportation of beverages to apartments should be done in an inconspicuous manner with all drinks sealed. Residents who decide to consume alcohol will be expected to dispose of alcohol cans or bottles discreetly.
  7. No person may sell alcoholic beverages. This includes charging an admission fee or imposing costs or expenses on other persons for the purposes of providing alcoholic beverages.
  8. Public intoxication and/or disruptive behavior related to the consumption of alcohol will be considered a violation of this policy.
  9. Persons are expected to have an age identification document in their personal possession. A College official, staff member, or designee may request to see age identification from the person if that person is suspected of an alcohol policy violation.
  10. Compliance with this policy is considered to be part of the student’s obligation as a student at Centenary College. Failure to comply with this policy will result in a conduct violation filed to the Office of Residence Life and/or the Office of Student Conduct and may result in the revocation of alcohol privileges and additional sanctions commensurate to the severity of the violation, as determined by the hearing officer.

Alcohol at Campus Events
Alcohol is permitted at some campus events with prior approval. Students or student groups wishing to serve alcohol at their events must complete an online calendar request and an Alcoholic Beverage Authorization Request form. The Director of Public Safety will determine the appropriate security and monitoring controls required for the event. If additional police officers are required, groups without campus accounts will be required to pay in advance.

All student events involving alcohol must fully comply with the Campus Events Policy and Procedures.

Athletics Policies
Student athletes are expected to know and follow all policies and guidelines listed in the Student Athlete Handbook, where those policies do not conflict with institutional policies, the student handbook, or NCAA Division III requirements. All students are expected to exhibit good sportsmanship during athletic events in compliance with rules set by Centenary, our conference, and the NCAA.

Bias Incidents and Hate Crimes

The College is mindful that academia is an environment in which the exchange of ideas, robust debate, and artistic expression are critical. We are committed to being a diverse and inclusive campus community, strengthened intellectually and socially by the range of background, belief, knowledge, opinion, and political perspective of our members, as such a community better prepares students to address the global challenges of the twenty-first century. The College strives to balance the protection of academic freedom and individual freedoms (e.g.: association, artistic expression, speech) with ensuring equal and fair treatment of all members of a campus which is conducive to learning and avoids harassment or a hostile educational and/or employment environment, with the implicit understanding that these values may sometimes be in conflict. Because bias has the potential to adversely affect the members of the campus community and undermine the climate of civility and respect necessary to achieve and maintain a diverse and inclusive community engaged in academic pursuits, the College takes steps to prevent and diminish bias as well as respond to complaints of bias.

The Clery Act requires reporting of hate crimes. A hate crime as a crime which in whole or in part is motivated by the offender’s bias toward the victim’s status because the victim’s perceived: color, disability, gender, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation. All crimes, including hate crimes, should be reported to the Department of Public Safety.

Bias incidents may or may not rise to the level of a crime. A bias incident can consist of an act or behavior motivated by one person’s bias against one or more facets of another person’s identity and/or any conduct or expression which is reasonably likely to demean, degrade, harass, intimidate, mock, or threaten individuals or groups based on actual or perceived facets of identity. Bias may occur whether or not the act is intentional and whether or not the bias is acknowledged. Bias may be directed toward an individual or a group. Bias may contribute to creating an unsafe and/or unwelcoming environment which intimidates others based on facets of one’s identity. Facets of identity include factors such as age, ancestry, citizenship/immigration status, disability, ethnicity, gender expression, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, and veteran status.

Examples of bias incidents include, but are not limited to: unapproved advantages or disadvantages based on identity; damage to property; defacing or prematurely removing of signs of an advocacy or cultural organization associated with identity; use of negative images, slurs, or verbal epithets associated with identity; threatening or demeaning communication based on identity (including, but not limited to email, mail, note, sign, social media post, spoken statement, text message, voicemail, or written statement); or any incident that members of campus would reasonably conclude targets a person or group based on actual or perceived identity.

The reporting of bias incidents and any and all crimes (including hate crimes) is encouraged. Such reporting can be anonymous. Campus community members who perceive that they have experienced or witnessed a bias-motivated incident are urged to report the incident immediately.

The people to whom and offices to which one may report include: Dean of Students, Department of Public Safety, Director of Athletics, Director of Student Conduct, Diversity Committee, Human Resources, Provost, Athletic Director, Athletics Diversity and Inclusion Designee, and the Title IX Officer. Additionally, should faculty, staff, and student employees not listed above (e.g.: coaches, professors, Resident Assistants (RAs), or supervisors of staff and/or of student workers) be the first people who are told of such an incident, they can support the person who informed them and help direct that person toward one of the above, while following mandatory reporting procedures as applicable. In addition, the Counseling Center or the Chaplain can provide confidential services and support regardless of whether an incident is otherwise reported. Moreover, students might receive support from student organizations, such as advocacy and cultural groups as well as the Student Government Association.

The College makes meaningful efforts to be both proactive for the benefit of the entire campus community and also responsive to parties involved and allegedly involved with regards to any report of a bias incident. The College understands that all stakeholders or all constituency groups may not be satisfied with the outcomes of a particular process or a particular response, whether or not that involves a police report, a student conduct case, employment disciplinary action, a restorative justice process, a campus dialogue event, and/or other responses. Each incident is unique and the responses to different incidents will necessarily vary.

Civil and Criminal Law
Students should refrain from conduct which violates city, state, and/or federal laws.
Suspected violations of the law may be referred to the Centenary College Department of Public Safety (DPS) and/or any other appropriate law enforcement agency. Criminal complaints filed against a student for on or off campus behavior may result in disciplinary action through the college’s Student Conduct system.

Duty to Seek Assistance

Reckless behavior is any activity or behavior in which a reasonable person knew or reasonably should have known that the activity or behavior may result in injury to another, including but not limited to excessive consumption of alcohol, binge drinking, drag racing, consumption of any controlled dangerous substance, acts of hazing, or other similar activity.

Louisiana law requires any person at the scene of an emergency who knows that another person has suffered bodily injury caused by an act of hazing or other reckless behavior to, to the extent that the person can do so without danger or peril to self or others, give reasonable assistance to the injured person.
Appropriate authority includes:

i) Any state or local law enforcement agency.
ii) A 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Pint as defined in Title 33 of the Louisiana Revised Statues of 1950.
iii) Emergency medical personnel.

The criminal penalties for failure to seek assistance include being fined not more than one thousand dollars, imprisoned with or without hard labor for not more than one year, or both if the person lives, while if the serious bodily injury results in death, being fined not more than two thousand dollars, imprisoned with or without hard labor for not more than five years, or both.

Failure to Cooperate
Students must comply with official College policies and cooperate with the requests of College officials (e.g.: faculty, administration, Residence Life staff) in the performance of their duties. Students who do not attend scheduled Student Conduct hearings and sanction meetings or who do not complete assigned Student Conduct sanctions on time are also considered in violation of this policy and may be assigned additional sanctions.

False Information
Willfully and knowingly furnishing false information to the College or a College official, including the Residence Life staff, is prohibited.

Fire Alarms and Fire Safety Equipment
Giving a false alarm of fire or willfully and knowingly tampering with fire safety equipment is in violation of campus policy and state law. Centenary College considers these violations to be very serious as they could result in the loss of human life. Individuals found to be guilty of these violations face disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution.

Firearms, Explosives, and Weapons
Possession of firearms, explosives, and other weapons is prohibited in all residence halls in accordance with our institutional policy prohibiting the use, possession or distribution of weapons or explosives on College property and at College-sponsored events. Centenary College’s definition of weapons includes not only guns and other items considered weapons under Louisiana state law, but also clubs, air rifles, BB and pellet guns, knives (other than small cooking and pocket knives), slingshots, and paintball guns and ammunition. Items such as firecrackers, bottle rockets and the like are considered “explosives.”

Hazing

Hazing in any form (physical or emotional), on or off campus, by an individual, group of individuals, or campus organization is strictly prohibited. Hazing is any intentional, knowing, or reckless act by a person acting alone or acting with others that is directed against another when both of the following apply:

  1. The person knew or should have known that such an act endangers the physical health or safety of the other person or causes severe emotional distress.
  2. The act was associated with pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, participating in, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization.

Consent is not a defense.

Hazing includes, but is not limited to, any of the following acts associated with pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, participating in, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization:
a) Physical brutality, such as whipping, beating, paddling, striking, branding, electric shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body, or similar activity.
b) Physical activity, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to the elements, confinement in a small space, or calisthenics, that subjects the other person to an unreasonable risk or harm or that adversely affects the physical health or safety of the individual or causes severe emotional distress.
c) Activity involving consumption of food, liquid, or any other substance, including, but not limited to, an alcoholic beverage or drug that subjects the individual to an unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affect the physical health or safety of the individual or causes severe emotional distress.
d) Activity that induces, causes, or requires an individual to perform a duty or task that involves the commission of a crime or an act of hazing.

For purposes of this policy, hazing shall not include a physical activity that is normal, customary, and necessary for a person’s training and participation in an athletic, physical education, military training, or similar program sanctioned by the College.

For the purposes of this hazing policy, organization is a fraternity, sorority, association, corporation, order, society, corps, cooperative, club, service group, social group, music group, spirit group, athletic team, or similar group whose members are primarily students at, or former students of, the College, including the national or parent organization of which any of the underlying entities provided for in this definition is a sanctioned or recognized member at the time of the hazing.

For the purposes of this hazing policy, pledging is any action or activity related to becoming a member of an organization, including recruitment and rushing.
Serious bodily injury is bodily injury that involves unconsciousness, extreme physical pain, or protracted and obvious disfigurement, or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member, organ, or mental faculty, death, or a substantial risk of death.

Hazing is not merely a violation of College policy; it is a criminal act.

 

Honor Code
Students must adhere to the Honor Code of Centenary College. (see Honor Court Constitution and guidelines for the Centenary Honor System for more details)

Inappropriate Conduct
Harassing behavior and conduct that leads to embarrassment or indignity of others is not permitted. Students may not dress in a manner that is disruptive. Disrespect toward College officials (including Residence Life staff) is not permitted. Inappropriate contact with or illegal or immoral conduct toward juveniles, including but not limited to supplying alcohol to students under 18 or allowing pre-college aged students to drink in a residential building, fraternity or sorority house, or other official or unofficial college party, on or off campus, is strictly prohibited. Any act which demeans, unduly embarrasses, endangers mental or physical health, that causes or is likely to cause physical harm or emotional distress, or that encourages behavior that is inappropriate, humiliating, illegal, or in violation of the Centenary Code of Conduct is not permitted. The express or implied consent of another party, including a victim, is not a relevant defense.

Misuse of College Materials
Students may not forge, alter, or otherwise misuse College documents, records, identification and other materials, records, access codes, computer passwords or computer software.

Misuse of Property
Misuse of property is defined as theft of, damage to, or illegal possession of property. Littering, vandalism, and other acts which permanently or temporarily deface or destroy College buildings and/or grounds also violate this policy.

Obstruction of Proceedings or Activities
Individuals may not obstruct, disrupt, or hinder teaching, administration, disciplinary proceedings or other College activities, including public service functions or other authorized activities on College property.

Physical Abuse or Threat of Abuse
It is illegal not only to intentionally use force or violence upon other people but also to intentionally place other people in fear that they will be a victim of force or violence. An individual can be placed in apprehension of violence not only by verbal threats but also by threatening behavior, gestures, pictures etc. Consequently, any conduct which threatens or endangers the health, safety or wellbeing of any person affiliated with the college , on College property or at a College sponsored function or any function of a College-recognized, registered, or sponsored group or organization is strictly prohibited.

Students should report any incident of physical abuse or the threat of physical abuse, regardless of whether or not they are the victim, to the Department of Public Safety in order that measures can be taken to protect the victim. The Protection from Dating Violence Act provides a victim of violence from a dating partner all the same services, benefits and other forms of assistance available to victims of domestic abuse such as Temporary Restraining Orders. This law is not gender specific and it applies to those in dating relationships, whether they are of the same or a different gender as their partner. Victims are also encouraged to seek counseling at the Centenary College Counseling Center or one of the counseling centers listed under "Resources for Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Sexual Assault."

Posting and Publicity on Campus

Posting in or on Residential Buildings
All publicity in or on the residential buildings must be approved by either the Director of Residence Life or the Assistant Director of Residence Life for that area. This includes postings by student organizations in good standing with the college. Requests for posting during August Term will likely be denied. Those who post materials are responsible for their removal per the below campus policy. Materials should adhere to the below campus policy. Those who do not adhere to these policies may lose posting privileges for the remainder of the semester or academic year.

Other Publicity
All other publicity on Centenary College’s campus or in any campus building that is posted by students, organizations, or outside entities must be approved by the Director of Student Involvement or designee. The only exception to this rule is that registered student organizations are allowed posting privileges without review so long as they are in good standing with the College and follow the rules and restrictions of posting on campus. Registered student organizations, as well as other organizations, businesses, and individuals alike, are responsible for removal of their publicity no later than three (3) days after an event or one week after the date of posting if there is no event date. Any individual or organization that does not adhere to this policy may lose posting privileges for a minimum of the remainder of the semester. When posting publicity around campus, all must follow these restrictions:
1) The source of each banner, poster, or other form of publicity will be clearly indicated. Exceptions may be approved by the Director of Student Involvement.
2) No vulgar, violent, hateful, or discriminatory speech or images shall be displayed as part of publicity on Centenary’s campus.
3) Only approved staff are allowed to move, remove, or post over other publicity unless it is past the specified event or one week following the initial advertising or was not approved or posted by a registered campus organization.
4) Only masking tape or blue painter’s tape shall be used on exterior glass and on indoor surfaces. Only painter’s tape may be used on painted surfaces. Those who use other types of tape may be subject to posting probation for the remainder of the semester or academic year as well as up to $50.00 per flier or poster in fines for damages incurred to paint or other surfaces and/or cleaning costs. Individuals who are fined will receive a hold on their accounts in the Business Office until the fine is paid. Organizations who receive a fine will not be able to publicize, fundraise, receive funds, or participate in campus-wide events such as homecoming until the fine is paid. Individuals and organizations not affiliated with the campus must first gain approval and sponsorship to post and they may be billed and lose the privilege of publicizing on Centenary’s campus for a minimum of one semester if they violate these practices.
5) Publicity cannot directly or indirectly promote the presence, use, or abuse of alcohol or other drugs. Events (on or off-campus) involving alcohol may only be promoted if they have been approved according to the Campus and Off Campus Events policies, in which case they can announce the availability of alcohol but may not promote the use or abuse of alcohol.
6) Publicity may not be posted on the exterior doors of buildings or on stairwell doors without specific prior approval from the Director of Student Involvement or designee. Other areas may be designated by the Director of Student Involvement or the staff/faculty member responsible for a specific building/area as no-posting or limited posting areas.

Chalking
In the event an individual or organization decides to chalk for publicity or other purposes, the messages must follow the same restrictions as the publicity restrictions listed above. In addition to these restrictions, chalk also:

1) Must not be placed on any surface that would not typically be washed by the rain. This means chalk cannot be put on vertical surfaces (such as walls or the sides of trashcans) or under awnings.

2) Must not be placed on any surface that is used for sitting such as the rails of the cafeteria deck.

If chalk is used anywhere it should not be and/or is not washed off by the weather within a reasonable time, the individual or organization responsible must wash the chalk within three (3) days of being notified or else they will be subject to a fine of up to $50.00 per incident or message. Continued refusal to clean the chalked surfaces may result in additional fines or sanctions.

Preparation Week
The College has set aside the week before final exams in both the fall and spring terms as a special time to review academic work and prepare for final exams. It is designated as Preparation Week. The following policy and requirements are designed to help students concentrate on their studies by reducing the usual multitude of college activities that demand time and attention. As of 8:00 a.m. on the first day of Preparation Week, no papers, tests or additional work (beyond completion of courses) may be assigned. Lab tests may be given during Preparation Week. Class assignments made earlier in the semester may be given during Preparation Week.
As of 8:00 a.m. the 4th day of Preparation Week and continuing through exam week, no college-sponsored or affiliated groups may hold meetings or programs that involve students and/or require student attendance. The Honor Court or Conduct Review Committee acting on official business may meet at this time. On the Saturday of Preparation Week, from 6:00 p.m. to 12:00 midnight, there will be suspension of these requirements allowing students and their organizations opportunities for recreational activities. At midnight, Preparation Week requirements resume and continue through exam week. The Dean of Students may consider petitions for exceptions to student policies governing Preparation Week. Concerns or questions regarding faculty or classroom Preparation Week polices should be directed to the Office of the Provost.

Public Expression
Students and approved organizations have the right to publicly assemble and express themselves provided they abide by all College, State, and Federal policies, procedures, and laws.

Residential/Housing Policies
All residential and commuter students are responsible for knowing and abiding by all housing policies while in residential facilities.

Sexual Assault and Violence

A survey of college aged women across the United States found that nearly one in four reported being a victim of rape, attempted rape or non-consensual sexual contact. Various studies have shown that the majority of sexual assaults are committed by someone known to the victim, and that most sexual assaults are committed by serial offenders, meaning they commit multiple assaults and/or offenses. In response to these alarming statistics, Centenary College has implemented various educational programs regarding sexual assault. Sexual assault or violence of any type will not be tolerated in the Centenary College Community. Acts of sexual assault and/or violence are considered a violation of federal law under Title IX and may or may not also be a violation of Louisiana State laws.

The term “Sexual Assault” by definition refers to a threat of harm coupled with an apparent, present ability to cause said harm, but is also a term used to identify a number of different offenses. Many of these offenses are also considered form sexual violence. Below is a list of sexual offenses that are considered to be a form of sexual assault and/or violence:

  • Rape, which is defined as anal, oral, or vaginal intercourse committed without the person’s lawful consent. Students should be aware that intoxicated persons who are not able to understand the nature of the act are not capable of giving lawful consent. In cases involving vaginal or anal intercourse emission is not necessary and any penetration is sufficient to complete the crime. Oral sexual intercourse is defined as the touching of the anus or genitals of the victim by the offender using the mouth or tongue of the offender or vice versa.
  • Sexual battery is defined as the touching of the anus or genitals of the victim by the offender using any instrumentality or any part of the body of the offender or vice versa without the consent of the victim. In general terms sexual battery occurs when a person touches another in an intimate area without the consent of the victim.
  • Dating and Domestic Violence is a pattern of abusive behaviors used to exert power and control over a partner. Dating/Domestic violence can include physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure or wound someone. Dating/Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, sexual orientation, social economic status, education, age, religion, etc. Dating/Domestic violence can also affect family, friends, co-workers and members in the community, in addition to the victim and abuser. Domestic violence can occur regardless of the relationship status, including individuals who are dating, cohabitating, or married.
  • Sexual Exploitation refers to a situation in which a person takes or attempts to take non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another and situations in which the conduct does not fall within the definitions of Sexual Harassment, Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse, or Non-Consensual Sexual Contact. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:
    • Sexual voyeurism (such as watching a person undressing, using the bathroom or engaged in sexual acts without the consent of the person observed).
    • Taking pictures, video, or audio recording another in a sexual act or in any other private activity without the consent of all involved in the activity or exceeding the boundaries of consent (such as allowing another person to hide in a closet and observe sexual activity, or disseminating sexual pictures without the photographed person’s consent).
    • Prostitution and/or sex trafficking.
    • Sexual Exploitation also includes engaging in sexual activity with another person while knowingly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or other sexually transmitted disease (STD) and without informing the other person of the infection, and further includes administering alcohol or drugs (such as “date rape” drugs) to another person without his or her knowledge or consent.
  • Stalking is the intentional and repeated following or harassing of another person that would cause a reasonable person to feel alarmed or to suffer emotional distress. Examples of stalking include threats of any crime (such as kidnapping, bodily harm, sexual harm and death) made with words or by acitons. The threats can be to you or to any member of your family or any person who you are acquainted with. Stalking can also include uninvited presence of the stalker at your home, workplace, school, or any please which would cause a reasonable person to be alarmed.
  • Sexual Harassment which is defined in the following section.

If you are the victim of a sexual assault or act of sexual violence, please get help quickly. If the offense occurred on campus you are encouraged to contact the Department of Public Safety or, if off campus, the city police or sheriff’s department to discuss criminal charges and proceedings under Louisiana law. If you wish to press charges within student conduct, either in addition to or instead of criminal charges, please email the campus Title IX coordinator at title-ix@centenary.edu or speak with a member of the Title IX response team.

Filing a report at the time of the crime will help protect you and others from further victimization, help apprehend the assailant and maintain your future options regarding criminal prosecution, college disciplinary action and/or civil action against the perpetrator. You will not be required to press criminal charges or go to the hospital, but will have the option to do so. If you choose to contact the police you should not touch anything, change your clothing, shower or douche to prevent any evidence from being destroyed. A law enforcement officer will take your statement regarding what transpired and will make arrangements for you to go to the hospital. At the hospital you will first be treated for any injuries. Hospital personnel will then follow a special rape protocol, which includes the collection of evidence, testing for sexually transmitted disease and the option of receiving a post-rape contraceptive.
If you do not wish to report the violation to the police you should still seek counseling from the College Counseling Center or other counseling programs which are listed in the section of the Student Handbook entitled "Resources for Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Sexual Assault." Centenary College personnel from Residential Life, the Dean of Students Office, the Counseling Center and the Department of Public Safety are available to assist you in any manner possible including arranging for a change in academic or living situations.

Sexual Harassment

Centenary College seeks to cultivate a spirit of community in which each individual may participate without fear of intimidation. The College does not tolerate capricious discrimination in any form.* All employees and students are urged to avoid any action or conduct, which might be construed as sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is defined as follows:

Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a requirement of employment or participation in an academic program or activity, (2) submission or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for employment or academic decisions affecting such individual, or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working, academic or campus environment.

Any behavior deemed to be sexual harassment by a member of the staff or faculty shall be reported directly to the Director of Human Resources or the aggrieved party's supervisor (immediate or higher, or in cases where the supervisor is the alleged harasser, to the Provost or College President); a student shall report to the Dean of Students or the Director of Student Conduct. (Hereafter, the individual who receives the information from the complainant will be referred to as the facilitator.) After consultation with the facilitator, the matter of alleged harassment shall be pursued further following the sequence outlined below. A fair process shall be observed in which the rights of both the complainant and the accused are respected. The investigation of the complaint will proceed as follows:

To encourage that the issue be resolved informally, a meeting of the facilitator, the complainant, the complainant's advocate (if so desired by the complainant), the accused and the accused's advocate (if so desired) shall be called by the facilitator and shall encourage open discussion, in which both parties involved in the complaint may hear a description of the situation from the other's point of view in an effort to resolve the complaint. This meeting shall remain confidential without documentation.
Should the complaint not be resolved informally, the complainant may formalize the complaint; a written and signed complaint must be filed with the Office of the President within one (1) calendar year.
If the accused is a student, a Communications Report or Report of Suspected Student Misconduct shall be filed with the Director of Student Conduct, who shall, in turn, refer the case to an administrative hearing officer or the Conduct Review Committee. They will process the case in accordance with policies and procedures established in the current Centenary College Student Handbook.

  • If the accused is a faculty member, then a complaint shall be filed with the Provost, who shall forward the complaint to the Faculty Personnel. This committee is charged with making a recommendation of remedial action to the Provost.
  • If the accused is a staff member, then a complaint shall be filed with his or her immediate (or higher) supervisor, who shall request that the administration appoint an ad-hoc committee comprising no less than three (3) members of the staff to hear the complaint. The committee is charged with making a recommendation of remedial action to the appropriate senior officer or to the President of the College.
  • If the accused is a member of the senior administration, then the complaint shall be filed with either the Provost or the President of the College, who shall set up an ad-hoc committee comprising no less than three (3) members of the administration to hear the complaint. The committee is charged with making a recommendation of remedial action to the President.

A recommendation of remedial action may include, but is not limited to, the following: no action taken, a warning, documentation in the individual's permanent personnel record, or dismissal of the student or employee. All paperwork associated with investigation of the complaint shall be maintained in a confidential file in the Office of the President.

Harassment on the basis of sex is a violation of Section 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sexual Harassment is also a violation of federal law under Title IX. Title IX violations including sexual harassment can also be reported to the Title IX Coordinator by emailing title-ix@centenary.edu.

Smoking and vaping Policy
Smoking and vaping are prohibited in campus residence halls, near doorways, on residence hall balconies, porches, and steps, and in residence hall courtyards in accordance with the institutional policy on smoking. Smoking devices such as pipes, water pipes, or hookahs must be registered with the Department of Public Safety and can be inspected upon request by campus officials.

Sports/Recreation Policy
Playing or practicing golf is not allowed on campus due to the potential of injury to bystanders and the possibility of damaging college grounds and property. Playing golf with a tennis ball (Tolf) is permitted only if care is taken not to hit any person or campus building with the ball. Throwing a Frisbee on campus or playing Frisbee golf is permitted providing care is taken with pedestrians in the area. Roller blades/skates are not permitted inside any facility or on any tennis court. Skateboards are not permitted on campus. Battery powered personal transportation devices, known as hover boards or self-balancing scooters, may not be stored in residence halls. Bicycles are permitted on campus but are not allowed inside residence halls or other buildings.

Unauthorized Entry
Unauthorized entry into or use of any College facility or property is a violation of campus policy and possibly of state law.

 

Student Conduct

Responsible student conduct is fostered by example, counseling, guidance, admonition, and when necessary, by disciplinary proceedings related to the College's standards of scholarship, student conduct, and the use of facilities. The College's student conduct system offers procedural fairness to students involved in the process. Practices in disciplinary cases vary in formality, taking into account the gravity of alleged offenses and the sanctions that may be applied. Minor penalties may be assessed informally under prescribed procedures.

Honor
Although students are not asked to sign an honor statement with regards to non-academic behavior, as they are with regards to academic work, students are expected to behave honorably. Students are required to report academic violations, and are also encouraged to report behavioral (non-academic) violations of campus policies or community standards. Living honorably, including reporting all types of violations, strengthens the foundations for students’ personal lives, supports our community’s focus on ethical development, and supports the qualities of moral courage, responsibility, and fairness.

Alleged Misconduct
All members of the campus community are encouraged to report information regarding apparent rule-violating behavior. Reports of alleged behavioral (non-academic) misconduct may be filed with the Dean of Students, the Director of Student Conduct, a member of the Residence Life staff, and/or the police officers of the Department of Public Safety.

Hearing Bodies
Reports of alleged behavioral (non-academic) misconduct may be assigned to a Hearing Body. Hearing Bodies include Administrative Hearing Officers, the Residence Halls Association (RHA), and the Conduct Review Committee. RHA is solely an Appellate Body; the Conduct Review Committee hears both original cases and appeals, as outlined herein. 

Standards of Evidence
The standard of evidence used to make findings will be a preponderance of the evidence. Preponderance is the legally required standard in some student conduct cases and is the standard used by the College in all behavioral (non-academic) cases of alleged misconduct. Preponderance means that the evidence suggests that it is more likely than not that the student engaged in the alleged rule-violating behavior.

 Legal Counsel and Representation
Campus judicial and student conduct proceedings are not legal proceedings, and neither complainant nor accused students may have legal counsel, a parent, or anyone else represent them in campus conduct hearings or proceedings, other than a Case Advisor. Legal counsel may only attend hearings or proceedings if expressly required by law, and in those situations may not speak other than to advise their client.

 Findings
A Hearing Body finds that either there is sufficient evidence or insufficient evidence to support the allegation of rule-violating behavior. A Hearing Body may find that the evidence is sufficient with regards to some alleged behaviors while also find that the evidence is insufficient with regards to other alleged behaviors within the same case. A Hearing Body may hold a hearing in absentia if a student facing charges fails to appear for the hearing or otherwise refuses to cooperate in the student conduct process and/or a student facing charges withdraws from the College between the time of the alleged misconduct and the scheduled hearing.

In the latter case, the Hearing Body may decide to wait until the student returns before conducting the hearing.

 Sanctions
If a Hearing Body finds that the evidence is sufficient to support at least one allegation of rule-violating behavior, the Hearing Body may assess one or more sanctions. The number of sanctions need not match the number of violations. The Hearing Body shall take the totality of the circumstances into account when issuing sanctions, potentially including prior offenses. Sanctions from Hearings include, but are not limited to:  formal warnings, probation, loss of privileges, fines, restitution, discretionary sanctions, residential separation (temporary or permanent), and exclusions from certain activities and/or certain areas of or locations on campus. Sanctions from the Conduct Review Committee include, but are not limited to, those sanctions available to other Hearing Bodies as well as suspension or expulsion from the College. 

Appeals
Both accused students and complainants have the right to appeal the original Hearing Body’s decision. Appeals must be made in writing to the appropriate Appellate Body, the Director of Student Conduct, or the Dean of Students within one week of the date of the decision being made available to the student.

All requests for appeal will be considered by the appropriate Appellate Body. A request for an appeal does not guarantee that an appeal hearing will be granted. 

The appropriate Appellate Body varies based on case origins and the Hearing Body being appealed. Appellate Bodies for given circumstances are as follows:

  • The results of an administrative hearing involving housing policies may be appealed to the Residence Hall Association
  • All other (non-academic) appeals are considered by the Conduct Review Committee
  • Decisions of the Conduct Review Committee are generally considered final, but may be appealed to the Dean of Students
     

Appellate Bodies may uphold or overturn previous decisions. They may eliminate, reduce, uphold, increase, or modify sanctions as they see fit. 

Role of Hearing Officers
Administrative Hearing Officers will hear cases which arise from reports of alleged behavioral (non-academic) misconduct, the potential sanctions of which would not result in suspension or expulsion. 

Role of the Director of Student Conduct
The Director of Student Conduct will oversee the behavioral (non-academic) student conduct process of the College. The Director will designate, train, and oversee Hearing Officers who will hear cases. These Hearing Officers will include the Director of Student Conduct and the professional staff of Office of Residence Life, and may include other members of the College. The Director will train and assist the members of the Conduct Review Committee and work with the Advisor of the Residence Halls Association to convene, train, and oversee that body and its hearings. The director is responsible for routing cases to the Conduct Review Committee, and for functioning as the non-voting executive officer of the Committee charged with the responsibility of enforcing its decisions. 

Role of the Residence Hall Association
All Residence Hall Association (RHA) student conduct proceedings are closed. Decisions will be based solely on written reports and written testimony. RHA, when functioning as a Hearing Body, hears appeals of Hearing decisions from cases which originated within the residential buildings or the areas around them and have exclusively to do with residential policies. Sanctions from RHA Hearings include, but are not limited to:  formal warnings, probation, loss of privileges, fines, restitution, discretionary sanctions, and exclusions from certain activities and/or certain areas of or locations on campus. Appeals of RHA Hearing decisions are considered by the Conduct Review Committee. Technical aspects of RHA and its procedures are stated within its constitution and bylaws.

Role of the Conduct Review Committee
The duties of the Conduct Review Committee include hearing all cases of behavioral (non-academic) misconduct referred to it by the Director of Student Conduct. The Committee serves as the original Hearing Body for cases which may result in suspension or expulsion. The Committee also serves as the Appellate Body of both RHA and Hearing Officer decisions. Decisions of the Committee are usually considered final; however, decisions are appealable to the Dean of Students. Technical aspects of the Conduct Review Committee and its procedures are stated in its guidelines. In a case of an extraordinarily sensitive matter, the Director of Student Conduct may hear a case that might result in suspension or expulsion and in such a case, the Dean would hear the appeal.

Role of the Dean of Students
The Dean of Students will supervise the Director of Student Conduct. The Dean also hears appeals of Conduct Review Committee hearings decisions. In a case of an extraordinarily sensitive matter, the Director of Student Conduct may hear a case that might result in suspension or expulsion and in such a case, the Dean would hear the appeal.

Role of the President of the College
Inherent in the role of the President is the obligation to take whatever measures may be necessary to protect the wellbeing and integrity of the College and its members. This obligation is reserved for emergency or extraordinary circumstances only. Nothing herein shall be regarded as detracting from the traditional plenary powers of the President and, notwithstanding anything to the contrary, the President may, on the President’s own initiative and at the President’s own discretion, immediately and without procedural requirements, review or overturn a decision of the Dean of Students, suspend or expel a student, or otherwise suspend or terminate the student’s right to be present on the campus and/or to attend classes.  Such action may be subject to review by the Conduct Review Committee at the President’s discretion, but the status of the student, pending final action, shall remain that in which the President has placed the student.

 

Conduct Review Committee
Purposes and Responsibilities
A primary function of the Committee is to consider and decide all cases referred to it involving alleged behavioral (non-academic) misconduct, whether as the original Hearing Body or as an Appellate Body.
At the request of the Executive Council of the Student Government Association (SGA), the Committee will rule on the constitutionality of actions taken by SGA.
The Committee should stay informed about disciplinary problems and make recommendations to the Director of Student Conduct, Hearing Bodies, and other members of the administration charged with disciplinary responsibilities.

Composition of the Committee
The Committee shall be composed of six voting members and one non-voting member. The voting members shall be one faculty member, one staff member, and four students, as determined herein. The chair shall be the faculty member, or in the faculty member’s absence, the staff member. The Director of Student Conduct shall be a non-voting member of the Committee and shall function as its executive officer charged with the responsibility of enforcing decisions of the Committee. Alternate members may also be selected in the manners listed herein. Alternate members may take the place of their respective voting members in their absence.

The four student members, one representing each class, shall be nominated by a majority vote of the Student Government Association (SGA) Senate, subject to the approval of the President of the College. Student members shall not hold any elected office in the SGA or the Residence Hall Association and may not be members of the Honor Court.
The faculty member of the Committee shall be recommended by the Faculty Coordinating Committee and appointed by the President for a term of one academic year. For purposes of continuity, the faculty member will serve more than one term whenever practical.
The President of the College shall appoint the staff member of the Committee.
Meetings should be scheduled during fall or spring semester when practical. In anticipation of summer, the chair of the Committee is encouraged to call a meeting of the Committee in the early part of April to determine which members will be available during the summer and to determine the composition of the Committee for the summer. If the Committee has need to meet during a school break or during the summer and if an insufficient number of members are available, the SGA President shall nominate temporary student members, while the Chair of the Faculty Coordinating Committee (or if not available, the Provost) shall recommend the temporary faculty member.

Procedural Rules
Other relevant procedures and standards outlined herein also apply to the Committee.
For the Conduct Review Committee to consider an appeal, the student must file the appeal in writing with the Conduct Review Committee chairperson or the Director of Student Conduct within one week after a lower body has notified the student of a decision.
In order for the Committee to make a decision, a majority of the Committee’s voting members must be present. The faculty or staff chair must be present.
The Committee is encouraged to meet in regular session at least once each semester to discuss procedure and campus disciplinary problems.
The faculty chair, the Director of Student Conduct, the Dean of Students, or the President of the College can call a Committee meeting at any time either by verbal or written notice.
Sensitive information relevant to a case will not be disclosed to the members in advance. Prior to each hearing the chair shall ask Committee members if representatives of either side (accused or complainant) have approached them prior to the hearing, and to what extent. Persistent and/or other inappropriate contact prior to a Committee meeting may result in a charge such as obstruction of proceedings or inappropriate conduct. 
The proceedings of the meeting are held in strict confidence.
The faculty chair of the Committee will either prepare or request that the staff representative prepare two sets of minutes. One set of minutes will be kept by the Director of Student Conduct and the other in the Office of the President.
No members of the Committee who are interested in a particular case in any way other than through their official function as members of the Committee shall sit in judgment during the proceedings.
Written notification of charges shall be sent to the accused at least one week prior to the hearing containing all charges and directing them to this handbook for information regarding the hearing, the rights of the accused, and the regulations of the College. On request, written reports that will be presented during the hearing and a description of any physical evidence that may be presented will be provided to the accused student prior to the hearing.
The accused and the complainant (or an administrative officer of the College in lieu of the complainant) may present any evidence that the Committee deems pertinent and relevant to the case.

The Committee has the right to conduct the proceedings in absentia if:

a. a student facing charges fails to appear for the hearing or otherwise refuses to cooperate in the student conduct process and/or

b. a student facing charges withdraws from the College between the time of the alleged misconduct and the scheduled hearing.

In the latter case, the College may decide to wait until the student returns before conducting the hearing.

Both the student who is accused and the student who makes an accusation have the right to be assisted in the case by a faculty member or administrative staff member as a Case Advisor. Students have the right to select a faculty or staff member who agrees to serve as the Case Advisor. All consultations between accused students and their faculty/staff Case Advisors shall be considered privileged information; therefore, are inadmissible as evidence without the express written consent of the student advisee. 
The burden of proof rests upon the person bringing the charge. The evidence must represent preponderance, but it is not necessary to prove charges to the clear and convincing or beyond reasonable doubt standards. 
For the Committee to consider statements made against the accused, the accused must be advised of both the content of the statements and the names of those who made the statements. The accused must be given an opportunity to rebut unfavorable inferences, which might otherwise be drawn.
The accused shall be given the opportunity to testify and present evidence and witnesses.
All members of the Committee have the right to question the accused, the complainant, and the witnesses.
The accused, the complainant, and witnesses shall not speak to one another directly. The accused and the complainant have the right to ask the chair to pose questions to the accused, the complainant, and witnesses. Witnesses may request the chair’s permission to ask the chair to pose questions to the accused, the complainant, and other witnesses. The chair may use discretion in deciding whether to ask a question and the phrasing thereof.
The accused, the complainant, and the witnesses have the right to remain in the room as long as the case is being heard and until the Committee is ready to deliberate or consider a different case.
The decision of the Committee shall be based solely upon information presented to the Committee at the hearing, whether in the form of oral testimony, written documents, photographs, or other evidence.
The Committee will make findings with regards to whether or not the evidence is sufficient to support each of the individual charges.
If the Committee makes a finding that the evidence is sufficient to support at least one charge, the Committee will then issue one or more sanctions ranging from a formal warning through expulsion.
All information from previous student conduct hearings shall be admissible if the sanctioning phase is reached.
The chair communicates the Committee’s decision to the Director of Student Conduct (if the Director was not present). The chair or Director of Student Conduct will communicate the decision to the accused and the complainant, if applicable. The sanctions assessed, if any, will be conveyed to the accused student and will only be shared with the complainant when required by law.
The Director of Student Conduct will have three copies of a letter prepared that reflect the Committee’s decision. The letters are to be distributed as follows:  the accused, the President of the College, and the accused student’s file in the Office of Student Development.

Nothing herein shall be regarded as detracting from the President’s powers as set forth in the Student Handbook and other College documents.

 

Administrative Withdrawal Policy

Standards of Conduct form the basis for behavior in the academic community; the enforcement of such standards must protect the rights, health, and safety of members of that community in order that they may pursue their educational goals without undue interference.

Policy Statement
Centenary College may execute an administrative withdrawal when a student engages in behavior that poses a danger of causing harm to self or others, or disrupts the learning environment.

Reason for Policy
Centenary College is concerned about the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual welfare of its students. The College believes that all students have a responsibility for self-welfare, self-guardianship, and self-care. In addition, students are responsible for conducting themselves in a manner that is not violent or disruptive. When, in the judgment of the College, a student's behavior constitutes a disruption or danger to the living/learning environment which the college seeks to create, or presents a threat to the health or safety of the student or others, the College will intervene. This policy addresses students whose behavior is disruptive or dangerous to self or others, or which disrupts the learning environment of others.

Definitions
Danger to self or others and destructive behavior is here defined to include, but is not limited to the following:

Suicide attempts, or statement of suicidal intent
Self mutilation or injury
Assault or threatened assault of students, faculty, or staff
Excessive use of alcohol
Misuse or excessive use of prescribed medications
Criminal activity
Such dangerous and disruptive behavior may be in the form of a single behavioral incident or somewhat less severe but persistent dangerousness or disruption over a more extended period.

Procedure for Dealing with Disruptive or Dangerous Behavior
When a student's behavior is perceived to be dangerous or disruptive, to themselves or other members of the campus community, the matter shall be referred to the Dean of Students. In the event that the Dean of Students determines that the student's behavior is a potential danger or disruption to self or others, the following procedure will be initiated:

The Dean of Students, or in his/her absence, the Director of Student Conduct (hereafter referred to as "designee"), will notify the student that an administrative withdrawal is under consideration. The College may, in its sole discretion, execute an immediate administrative withdrawal leave should circumstances warrant.
The Student Resource Center, Associate Dean or faculty advisor will discuss with the student the implications of and procedures relating to an administrative withdrawal. A copy of this policy will be provided to the student. When possible and appropriate, the Student Resource Center, Associate Dean, or faculty advisor will offer an opportunity for the student to voluntarily withdraw, thereby eliminating the need to complete the process for an administrative withdrawal.
When an administrative withdrawal is being considered, the Dean of Students will convene a committee made up of representatives from at least two of the following departments: Public Safety, Residence Life, Student Conduct, Health Services, Counseling Services, Human Resources, or Athletics. The third member of the committee must be the faculty advisor, the Associate Dean, or a representative from the Student Resources Center. This committee will review the situation and make a recommendation.
During this review, the committee will consider the criteria for executing an administrative withdrawal, specifically whether the student engages in, or is judged to be likely to engage in, behavior that poses a danger of causing harm to self or others, or disrupts the learning environment. Whenever appropriate, the student will be permitted to provide additional information regarding the situation.
Following this review, the Dean of Students and the Provost or their designees will make a final decision regarding the administrative withdrawal, and must provide written notice of this decision to the student. (A return receipt must be requested.)
A copy of the final decision regarding the administrative withdrawal and a copy of the written notice to the student of this decision will be immediately delivered to the President of the college.

If an Administrative Withdrawal is Not Executed
The committee may impose other conditions and/or requirements under which the student is allowed to remain at the college.

If an Administrative Withdrawal is Executed
The Dean of Students or a designee will inform the student, along with notice of the decision, as to the steps that must be taken if the student is allowed to and wishes to re-enroll (See request for re-enrollment). The duration of leave will be determined by the Dean of Students and the Provost. The student must leave campus within the time frame set forth within the notification letter. The student must obtain permission in writing from the Dean of Students or designee to visit the campus during the duration of the leave. The Dean of Students or designee reserves the right to notify a parent, guardian or other person if notification is deemed appropriate. In addition, the parent, guardian or other person may be asked to make arrangements for the safe removal of the student from the College environment.

The refund policy, as outlined in the College Catalogue, would be applicable when an Administrative Withdrawal is executed.

Appeal
The student may appeal the final decision by making a written request for an appeal to the President of Centenary College. Such request must be received by the President's office within ten days of the date of receipt of the decision of the Dean of Students and the Provost. The student may request a meeting with President; however, it is at the President's sole discretion as to whether or not to meet with the student.

Request for Re-enrollment
A formal request for re-enrollment must be submitted to the Office of Admissions. The student's re-enrollment request will be reviewed by the Dean of Students and the committee that recommended the administrative withdrawal. This group must approve the re-enrollment. The Dean of Students reserves the right to require clearance by a health professional before the student is allowed to be considered for re-enrollment.

 

Centenary Honor System

Advantages of the Honor System

We of Centenary College are proud of the fact that our students govern their own academic performance through an Honor Code which they helped to write, and which they themselves administer. A national survey has shown that cheating occurs more often on campuses where no joint honor system is in effect and where enforcement of honesty is left up to the faculty alone. It occurs least often among students in colleges where both students and faculty participate in a functioning honor system. Our honor system is a classic example of growing student participation in self-government and responsibility for administrative affairs on campus. The increased freedom it affords gives those who participate in it room to grow in maturity and responsibility and to strengthen qualities of honesty and integrity. Sharing with the student body in the observance and administration of the Honor Code also benefits the college faculty. Faculty and students become partners in striving toward a lofty goal, and their common striving builds an atmosphere of trust and confidence. Faculty members are also relieved of the necessity of filling the role of policeman. The Centenary College Honor System was developed because the students proposed the idea to the college faculty and asked that the faculty join in writing and administering a workable code. The code was tried on an experimental basis in some departments of the college in 1953, and soon thereafter the present Honor Code was adopted as binding for all regular students of the college.

Requirements and Procedures
Basically, the code provides that a student will neither cheat nor will he/she tolerate cheating on the part of others. If you have registered at Centenary, you have signed a pact which automatically includes you as a part of our honor system, binding you to its terms and committing you to uphold its principles and its provisions. You have agreed to present work for credit which is wholly and only your own. When exams are given or when you present written work and research papers, no professor or proctor should be required as a policeman to insure that the work is you own, although a teacher may do so in incidents of suspected violation of the Honor Code. Your own personal integrity is your proctor. We administer the code through a student court composed of five members and two alternates who are chosen from among nominations made by the student body and the faculty. One member is elected to preside as Chief Justice. At least one faculty member serves as advisor and liaison officer. The Constitution of the Honor Court provides that all violations of the Code shall be referred at once to the Court. It also provides for hearings, suitable penalties upon conviction, and appeal of conviction. A conviction before the Honor Court for violation of the Honor Code may result in one of the following penalties: conviction with further penalty, Honor Court F on the work, Honor Court F in the course, suspension for one semester, or permanent expulsion from Centenary. Every student should thoroughly familiarize him/herself with the Honor Court Constitution printed in the preceding section of the Centenary College Student Handbook in order to understand exactly what his/her responsibilities are under the honor system. If you suspect that a violation of the Honor Code has occurred, it is your obligation to inform a member of the Honor Court of this fact as soon as possible. Names of the members of the Court will be posted in each classroom. If you do not know any of these students, you may send written notice to the Faculty Advisor, Honor Court, through campus mail. The Honor Court Constitution and the Honor Code are available online and all incoming students are expected to read them carefully. The honor system is also explained to new students during formal orientation each fall.

Research Papers and the Honor System
Most commonly, violations of the Honor Code concern plagiarism. In the interest of clarification, these guidelines are offered. Plagiarism in any work done under the honor system is a violation of the Honor Code and is a serious offense. You will be plagiarizing if (1) you are not accurate in indicating direct quotations from any source, including textbooks, or (2) you so not completely reword when you paraphrase. Rewording includes using your own language and your own sentence structure. A paraphrase should sound like you, not like the source with the words shifted around. Both quotations and paraphrasing require documentation. Any plagiarism, intentional or not, casts doubt on the honesty of all your statements. A Short Guide to Manuscript and Documentation Form, by Allen and Colbrunn, found under 029.6, AL53s, and the MLA Style Sheet found under 0-29, M72s, are both on permanent reserve in the library for your reference use. These pamphlets, along with the freshman English textbook and this explanation should indicate what is not proper credit and the correct form for giving credit. Borrowing an author’s ideas and putting them into your own words is paraphrasing and requires that credit be given for the ideas by means of a footnote or other clear procedure. Neither quotation marks nor indentations is used for paraphrasing, If you present another person’ ideas as your own, by not giving them credit, you are plagiarizing. When in doubt, footnote! Borrowing an author’s exact words is quoting and also requires a footnote or other clear credit to the source. Quotes must be placed in quotations marks, and if the quote is long, it should be indented and single spaced. If you quote an author and do not put the quote in quotations marks or indent, you are plagiarizing even if you do give a footnote! You are borrowing not only the author’s ideas but are presenting the words as your won. You still are not giving full credit and thus are plagiarizing. Usually two or more distinctive and sequential words from the source should be placed in quotation marks. Following is a reproduction of part of page 208 of Recent American Literature by Donald Heiney (great Neck, New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 1958). Following this reproduction are examples of three students’ uses of this reference in research papers. Two of the students, A and B, have given improper credit and therefore are guilty of plagiarism. Student C has given proper credit.

The Original Passage
Awarding of the Nobel Prize to Faulkner in 1950 has brought home to the American public the fact the in Europe he is considered the foremost living American author; today ,many American critics are inclined to agree in this judgment. The distinction in one to which he is well entitled. He is sometimes considered an agrarian naturalist in the manner of Erskine Caldwell; actually he is more meaningful and profound, as well as more artistically original, than any of the American naturalists with the possible exception of Hemingway. His novels are generally laid in rural settings, but the problems they treat are psychological and moral rather than physical. His great subject is the decline of the South; its economic sterility, its moral disintegration, and its struggle to resist the progressive and materialistic civilization of the North.

Student A’s Paper
The awarding of the Nobel Prize to Faulkner in 1950 has brought home to the American public the fact that in Europe he is considered the foremost living American author. His naturalism is sometimes compared to that of Erskine Caldwell. Faulkner’s naturalism is illustrated by his use of rural settings in his novels. His great subject is the decline of the South; its economic sterility, its moral disintegration, and its struggle to resist the progressive and materialistic civilization of the North.

Student A has plagiarized both ideas and words by presenting them as his/her own without any footnotes at all. He/she has violated the Honor Code.

Student B’s Paper
The awarding of the Nobel Prize to Faulkner in 1950 has brought home to the American public the fact that in Europe he is considered the foremost living American author. His naturalism is sometimes compared to that of Erskine Caldwell. Faulkner’s naturalism is illustrated by his use or rural settings in his novels, His great subject is the decline of the South: its economic sterility, its moral disintegration and its struggle to resist the progressive and materialistic civilization of the North.1

1Donald Heiney, Recent American Literature, (Great Neck, New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 1958) p.208.

Student B has given credit for the borrowed ideas by his footnotes, but not for the words which are also borrowed in places. Although a few words are changed, there are still complete sentences lifted intact from the original work without giving credit for the author’s words. Student B also has violated the Honor Code.

Student C’s Paper
Faulkner’s great talent has made him “the foremost living American author” to European critics.1 the rural settings of many of his novels illustrate his naturalism which is often compared with that of Erskine Caldwell. The central theme of Faulkner’s novels is the decline or the South.2

1Donald Heiney, Recent American Literature, (Great Neck, New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 1958) p.208.

2Ibid.

Student C has given credit for both the phrase “the foremost living American author” and for the ideas borrowed. He/she has given proper credit.

A Final Reminder
If you have any questions, it is your responsibility to ask your professor exactly what he/she requires in a paper that requires research or documentation. Let us remind you that this applies to all full-time and part-time undergraduate students whether in day or night classes.

 

Campus Organizations and Groups

For current listings of active campus organizations and groups, visit the OrgSync portal.

Expectations of Centenary College Community for Student Organizations
Centenary College offers many opportunities for membership in a variety of student organizations. All student organizations, Greek and non-Greek, must be approved by the Office of Student Involvement. To receive full recognition and privileges, they must also be chartered by the Student Government Association in accordance with their constitution and/or bylaws. All organizations are expected to abide, in letter and spirit, by the expectations outlined below, in addition to those contained in the remaining sections of the Student Handbook, their own constitutions, agreements with the College, and risk management policies mandated by the college or their insurance policies. Organizations with national affiliations are also expected to abide by all policies of their national or international association except where those policies may conflict with the policies and standards of Centenary College. In those cases the policies of Centenary College take precedence.

Approval and Registration for Student Organizations
All student organizations at Centenary are required to register each semester and to maintain accurate officer, advisor, constitution and roster information in the OrgSync portal. Failure to do so may result in suspension or revocation of privileges.

Forming a New Organization
Provisional Approval: A student or group wishing to form a new organization must submit an organization registration form on OrgSync, provide a petition signed by a minimum of 25 currently enrolled students who support the creation of this organization, and have a Centenary faculty/staff who agrees to serve as advisor. Groups who have completed these are considered for provisional approval. Provisionally approved organizations may participate in campus events, advertise their organization and organizational activities, and reserve meeting space on campus for a period of 45 days. They will also have access to their own organizational portal on OrgSync. 

Full Approval and Chartering: To complete the approval process, organizations must have at least 5 students join their OrgSync portal as full and active members and must be chartered by the Student Government Association (SGA) through passage of a resolution at a SGA meeting. Prior to going before SGA, the organization must have received provisional approval and must have at least 5 active members and a current constitution on the OrgSync portal. Procedural information on the SGA chartering process is available in the SGA constitution and bylaws. Once chartered by SGA, the organization must complete the OrgSync registration process and receive final approval from the Director of Student and Global Engagement.

Good Standing
In order to remain in good standing, organizations must maintain a Centenary faculty/staff advisor, a designated president or organization head(s), accurate and current information within the OrgSync portal, and at least five active members. Failure to do so may result in the suspension or revocation of privileges. If an organization falls below five active members or does not update their organizational information in OrgSync by the published deadline, the organization will be placed on probationary status. If an organization on probationary status does not recruit at least 6 active members and submit full and accurate information by the published organization registration deadline near the beginning of the following semester, recognition of that organization will be withdrawn. 

Membership
Active membership in Centenary student organizations shall be limited to part-time and full-time students enrolled at Centenary College.

Finances and Contracts
When institutional funds are being dispersed, all assumptions of financial obligations must be approved in advance by the Centenary faculty/staff advisor for that organization. Organizations receiving institutional funds include, but are not limited to, the Campus Activities Board, the Residence Hall Association, House Councils, student media organizations, the Student Government Association, and organizations or projects funded by the Student Government Association. Contracts may only be signed by the Vice-President for Finance and Administration.

Fund Raising
All student organization fundraisers where monetary gifts or donations larger than $25 will be solicited and accepted or if the fundraising activity is of a capital, operational, or endowed purpose must follow campus fundraising activities guidelines and must receive approval after submitting the “Request to Conduct Fundraising Activity” form. All other fundraisers (including efforts to raise money for charitable causes) must be approved by the Director of Student and Global Engagement or designee.

Guests
If a campus organization allows non-Centenary students, faculty, or staff to attend their event(s), that organization assumes full responsibility and may be held accountable for the conduct of those guests. All campus organizations are strictly forbidden from allowing minors (other than full-time Centenary students), high school students, or prospective new students from attending any event or social function, formal or informal, on or off campus, where alcohol is consumed unless specific written permission is granted in advance by the Director of Student and Global Engagement or designee.

Disciplinary Procedures for Student Organizations
In the case of suspected organizational misconduct, the Dean of Students, or his/her designee, may have the Department of Public Safety investigate the compliant. If there is credible evidence to indicate that organizational misconduct may have occurred, the Director of Student Conduct may refer cases involving student organizations to the Student Services Committee or to an Administrative Hearing Officer. The hearing body shall have the authority to decide when these regulations have been violated and issue appropriate action toward the organization. Actions by Hearing Officers may be formal or informal, and may or may not involve a formal hearing.

Types of organizational misconduct include hazing, violations of the Campus Organizations and Groups policy, the Campus Events or the Off-Campus Social Activities Policy, violations of Housing Policies, Community Standards or illegal activities by students who are affiliated with or representative of their organization. Any organizational action or inaction that endangers the health or wellbeing of students or other members of the community is also considered misconduct. If a Hearing Body finds that the evidence is sufficient to support at least one allegation of misconduct or rule-violating behavior, the Hearing Body may assess one or more sanctions. The number of sanctions need not match the number of violations. The Hearing Body shall take the totality of the circumstances into account when issuing sanctions, potentially including prior offenses. Sanctions from Hearings include, but are not limited to:  formal warnings, probation, loss of privileges, fines, restitution, discretionary sanctions, community or campus service, the termination of one or more event, revocation of permission to house students in fraternity houses, restriction of social or recruitment activities, and exclusions from certain activities and/or certain areas of or locations on campus. The Student Services Committee may also issue an indefinite revocation of campus recognition and all privileges associated with being a student organization at Centenary. If campus recognition and privileges are revoked indefinitely, a positive recommendation from the Student Services Committee and a majority vote of the faculty are required before the organization may apply to the Office of Student Involvement and SGA for reinstatement. 

All decisions by Administrative Hearing Officers may be appealed to the Student Services Committee by submitting a request for appeal to the Chair of the Student Services Committee, the Director of Student Conduct, or the Dean of Students within one week.

It should be noted that campus disciplinary action does not preclude criminal prosecution for violations of these regulations that are criminal in nature, nor do organizational misconduct proceedings prohibit individuals from also being charged with housing or community standards violations through the student conduct system.

 

Guidelines for Off-Campus Social Activities

Centenary College is committed to the integrated development of the mind, body, and spirit of its students. The College is also responsible for upholding federal, state, and local laws. In accordance with these goals and responsibilities, the College has established guidelines regarding off campus social activities sponsored by student organizations recognized by the College.

It is the responsibility of the host organization to ensure that all members and guests are familiar with and follow these guidelines. The College reserves the right to enter events to investigate compliance.

Social events where alcohol will be present shall not be open to the entire student population or the entire Greek community. Open events encourage risky behaviors and the likelihood of accidents increases. This type of function is strictly prohibited.

No kegs or common sources of alcohol (such as party punch) are allowed in Greek houses or at any event sponsored or endorsed by a college organization unless being dispersed by an approved 3rd party vendor. No drinking games, shots, or other activities that encourage irresponsible drinking behavior are allowed on college property or in college-affiliated buildings (including Greek houses).

Formal Party Guidelines
A formal party is defined as a pre-planned social activity where alcohol is present, to which members and guests have been invited.

Formal parties must be registered with the Department of Public Safety and the Office of Student Development  via the “Social Event Registration” form on OrgSync five working days in advance. If the registration deadline is not met the Department of Public Safety and/or the Office of Student Development may cancel the event. Invitation guest list must be typed in alphabetical order and must be turned into the Public Safety Officer on duty prior to the event. If the guest list is not submitted in a timely fashion, the Department of Public Safety and/or the Office of Student Development may cancel the event.

The maximum number of guests allowed on the guest list is 200 people; however, there can be only 150 people in the party location at any given time. The public safety officer on duty will make the determination as to when more guests will be allowed into the party location. The Office of Student Development, in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, can grant exceptions to this rule.

Invitation guest lists with specific names of all members and non-members who have been invited must be generated for each event. This list must be in alphabetical order. A bag full of invitations delivered to a student organization is not an acceptable method.

Security and Chapter Monitors
The Department of Public Safety, with student organization involvement, is responsible for arranging for all security officers for the party. If the Department of Public Safety is not able to fill the necessary security positions with DPS officers then the Department of Public Safety will arrange for other law enforcement officers from other agencies, such as the Shreveport Police Department and Caddo Sheriff’s Department, to work the event. This host organization will be responsible for paying all officers at the start of the party.

There will be two security officers and at least two chapter monitors at every party where alcohol is allowed. The Department of Public Safety, in conjunction with the Office of Student Development, can grant an exception to this rule based on the size and nature of the event.

Chapter monitors are responsible for assisting security officers in enforcing Centenary College’s Guidelines for Off-Campus Social Activities, as well as ensuring that the event does not become so loud as to disturb the neighbors or result in the issuance of noise disturbance citations. Chapter monitors are obligated to report any illegal activity at the party that they become aware of to the security officers at the event.

Chapter monitors are charged with regulating social events and maintaining the risk management policy of the organization involved.

Monitors should be older members, preferably officers, of the participating organizations. Pledges and New Members may not serve as monitors. A sign posted at the distribution center should list all of the monitors for the event. Monitors should be easily identifiable by wearing a button or recognizable attire. Monitors must be completely sober at the start of the event and that shall not drink for the duration of the event.

Monitors, security officers working the event, and any other law enforcement officers present have the right to deny access or to remove anyone from the event who they think is too impaired by alcohol or drugs, even if the person is on the invitation guest list.

Chapter presidents and social chairs should limit their use of alcohol, if consuming at all, during social events so that they, along with chapter monitors, ensure that a safe environment is maintained.

Entrance, Exits, and Layout of the Event
There will be only one well-lit entrance to the event. It will be controlled and monitored by security.

A sign shall be posted at the entrance that states that all guests entering the party are subject to Centenary College’s Guidelines for Off-Campus Social Activities. The sign shall all also state that underage drinking is strictly prohibited and it shall list the date that an individual must have been born by in order to legally drink alcoholic beverages.

Members and guests with alcohol are required to show proof of legal drinking age in the form a picture ID showing birth date.

A guest’s name is checked once entry to the event location has been made. Although guests may leave and return to the party at a later time, they may not bring any additional alcoholic beverages once their name has been checked off the list. However, if a guest of legal drinking age did not bring any alcoholic beverages upon their first arrival, they may do so upon their return to the party.

Formal parties at Greek houses are restricted to inside the host house and enclosed back yard.

Several exits must be available due to fire codes and laws; however, exits cannot be used as entrances. Violations of this regulation will subject the party to immediately being shut down.

The City of Shreveport has an "open container law." Therefore, any guest leaving the party will be required to dispose of the alcoholic beverage he/she is currently drinking into a trash can.

Scheduling and Timing of the Event
A request for a Formal Party will be denied if another event with alcohol has been scheduled for the same night and the two locations are in close proximity (closer than 3000 feet.)

Formal parties and any other event where alcohol is served may not last for more than six hours.

All events must end no later than 2 a.m. The Office of Student Development, in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, may grant exceptions to the rule.

Wristbands
Members and guests who are of legal drinking age and who bring alcohol to the event receive a non-adjustable, hospital-style wristband.

Members and guests who are of legal drinking age and who do not bring alcohol do not receive a wristband. Only those members and guests who bring alcoholic beverages are allowed to consume alcoholic beverages.

Members and guests who are not of legal drinking age do not receive a wristband. Wristbands will be supplied by the Department of Public Safety and will be brought to the event by one of the law enforcement officers scheduled to work the event. Different colored wristbands will be used for each function. The color of the wristband will not be announced until the start of the event.

Alcohol
The sponsoring organization will be responsible for having a representative at the party to dispense the alcohol that has been brought to the party by members and guests. The representative may not have an ABO license so as to not jeopardize the individual’s license. (This representative will be referred to as the "bartender.") The bartender for the event will not consume alcohol during the event. A bartender may not consume alcohol for at least one hour prior to the start of the event and he/she may not be intoxicated.

The bartender will maintain a list that includes the following: individual’s name, type of alcohol brought, the amount of alcohol brought and the times that the individual was served the alcohol.

The following stipulations apply per person for a typical four to five hour function: Each individual of legal drinking age can have two twelve-ounce cans of beer or 1.5 ten-ounce wine cooler per hour of the event OR one thirty-two ounce frozen drink in a Styrofoam cup with the straw taped to the top of the lid every two hours of the event.

Only one alcoholic beverage can be acquired at a time.

Anyone who wishes to acquire an alcoholic beverage that he or she brought to the event must show the wristband.

Upon receiving the request for an alcoholic beverage, the bartender is responsible for ensuring that the individual making the request has been served no more than two beers or one ten ounce wine cooler in the last hour. If the individual requests a thirty- two ounce frozen drink then the bartender is responsible for ensuring that the individual is not served any further alcohol for two hours.

The bartender must not serve anyone who is intoxicated even if the individual has alcohol remaining.

There will not be any beer, wine, or alcohol for common use in members’ rooms. With probable cause, the law enforcement officers working the party can search the members’ rooms.

During the last thirty minutes of an event, alcohol service should stop. A new nonalcoholic beverage should be served to those who wish to switch beverages and begin to wind down.

For events of two hours or less, alcohol can be served the entire time of the event. No alcohol will be returned to members or guests at the end of the evening. Any leftover alcohol at the end of the event will be turned over to the Department of Public Safety for proper disposal.

Alcohol Tester
The Department of Public Safety may have a breath alcohol analysis instrument available at any event where alcohol is served.

If a security officer, chapter monitor, or bartender believes that an individual of legal drinking age is intoxicated they may request that the individual in question submit to an alcohol test.

If the individual submits to the test and the test indicates a blood alcohol level of less than .05% then the individual may continue to drink alcoholic beverages in accordance with the Off-Campus Social Activities Guidelines.

If the individual submits to the test and the test indicates a blood alcohol level of .05% or more then the individual may not be served any additional alcoholic beverages until further testing indicates a blood alcohol level below .05%.

An individual of legal drinking age may refuse to submit to the test. Refusal to submit to the test, however, will result in the suspension of his/her drinking privileges for the remainder of the party.

If a security officer or a chapter monitor has reason to believe that a person who is not of legal drinking age has been drinking then they may request that the individual in question submit to an alcohol test.

Although the Department of Public Safety cannot ensure legal clemency, it shall be the policy of the Department of Public Safety to refer an underage subject who tests positive for the presence of alcohol for campus disciplinary action and not criminal prosecution provided that (1) it is the subject’s first offense and (2) there are not any other extenuating circumstances.

If a subject suspected of underage drinking refuses to comply with the request to submit to the alcohol test then if the security officer has sufficient probable cause the subject may be charged criminally in addition to being referred for disciplinary action. The subject will also be removed from the party.

Food and Non-Alcoholic Beverages
The host must provide soda, juice, bottled water, or other non-alcoholic beverages.

The host will be responsible for having at the start of the event at least one non-alcoholic beverage for every underage member and guest. The non-alcoholic beverages should be replenished as necessary.

Non-alcoholic beverages should be served from closed containers. Cans or individual serving size plastic bottles are required unless these beverages are served by a third party vendor.

Non-alcoholic beverages must be presented in an attractive and accessible manner. Non-alcoholic beverages must be free to anyone who desires an alcohol-free beverage. Tap water and coin-operated soda machines are not considered appropriate alternative beverages.

Breads, meats, cheeses, vegetables, brownies, cookies, sub sandwiches, pizzas, fruit, and dips are considered appropriate foods.

Food, non-alcoholic beverages, and alcoholic beverages should be contained in one centralized location whenever possible.

Swaps
Swaps between fraternities and sororities will be closed events. Only members of the sponsoring organizations will be in attendance – no guests will be allowed. Interactive activities should be planned and organized by the sponsoring organizations. Alcohol cannot be provided by the sponsoring organizations.

Informal Party Guidelines
An informal party will be defined as an unplanned gathering to which no invitations, written, verbal, or electronic, have been issued.

At informal parties, risk management guidelines for the hosting organization must be in effect.

If the gathering involves more than 50 people or becomes unmanageable as defined by the chapter, a law enforcement officer, or a Centenary College Student Development official, then a conscious effort to reduce liability and enforce formal party guidelines must be made, which might include contacting the Department of Public Safety to help control and/or shut down the event.

Third Party Vendor Guidelines
Sponsoring organizations must follow FIPG standards or established risk management guidelines and must comply with national, state, and municipal alcohol regulations.

Illegal Activity or Threats to Health or Safety
A Public Safety or Police officer may immediately shut down an event if he/she believes that illegal activity is occurring or that the event poses a threat to the safety and health of the members, guests, and neighbors.
 

Campus Services

Academic Advising and Assistance
The advisor is responsible for assisting students in all areas of academic life, such as assisting students with schedules and a degree plan which must be filed no later than the first semester of the junior year in the Office of the Registrar. At the time of admission to the College each student is assigned a faculty advisor who is available for advice in academic matters.

Academic Petitions
The faculty has established a procedure to act on the requests of students for exception to, or waiver of, academic regulations. The academic petition form is available here: http://www.centenary.edu/provost/academic_handbook/academic_petitions  Your advisor, the registrar, or the Office of the Provost can assist you. Students may not petition academic suspensions; enrollment for more than 21 hours in any regular semester (12 hours during the summer); more than a total of 18 pass/fail hours; and graduation with less than 124 hours or less than a 2.0 cumulative grade point average overall or in their major(s).

Address Change
It is the responsibility of each enrolled student to provide the College with up-to-date local and permanent mailing addresses. An address change that occurs any time after the student completes the registration process for the current semester should be reported to the Office of Student Development.

Commencement
The use of cords and tassels by academic departments, in addition to those issued to recognize academic honors, will be permitted. Cords and tassels utilized will be provided by the department in recognition of those receiving departmental honors or belonging to the honor society of that department. In addition, each department will be responsible for issuing the tassels or cords prior to commencement. Recognized student organizations and honor societies may also issue cords with the approval of the Director of Student and Global Engagement or designee. Students participating in the ceremony must wear appropriate regalia and may not wear any items or decorations that are in poor taste or are likely to be distracting during the ceremony. Helium balloons are not permitted in the Gold Dome.

Convocations
The College has set aside times for the entire campus community to gather for special programs and lectures. On occasions these gatherings are academic convocations resulting in formal processionals by faculty, staff, and seniors. All students and staff are encouraged to attend. Incoming first year students and graduating seniors are strongly encouraged to participate in the President’s Convocation. In order to preserve this time for a gathering of the entire campus community, both faculty and the Student Government Association have designated that no other meetings should be scheduled at this hour unless there is no official College function planned.

Counseling Assistance
Counseling Services, located on the ground floor of Rotary Hall, is available to provide short-term confidential counseling for students enrolled at Centenary. The Chaplain is also available to assist students with short-term needs. These resources are able to refer individuals to community resources and mental health facilities when indicated. Call (318) 869-5466 for Counseling Services or go to centenary.edu/life/counseling or the Chaplain at (318) 869-5029 or centenary.edu/religiouslife

Department of Public Safety
The goal of the Centenary College Department of Public Safety is to provide a safe environment so that the College can fulfill its educational mission. In order to accomplish this goal the Department of Public Safety (DPS) employs College Police Officers who have successfully completed a Basic Law Enforcement Training Academy and have been commissioned by the State of Louisiana. These officers have the same law enforcement powers, authority, and responsibilities as a state/city police officer or sheriff’s deputy including the power of arrest. The Department of Public Safety has staff on duty 24 hours a day every day of the year. DPS officers engage in around the clock patrols of the campus including the residence halls, Greek Houses, contiguous streets and parking lots. The Department of Public Safety is responsible for providing the college community with access to facilities. Requests to use campus facilities should be submitted through the campus calendar which will in turn provide the Department of Public Safety a facility use schedule. The Department of Public Safety is also responsible for enforcing parking regulations and other campus rules. DPS officers respond to crimes in progress, emergencies and to simply investigate incidents of suspicious behavior. They also write offense and traffic accident reports. The Department of Public Safety has proactive policies, which are geared to preventing crimes before they occur. The Department attempts to keep the college community apprised of ongoing criminal activity in the campus area or emergencies that may affect them via informational bulletins over e-mail. Escort across campus is available 24 hours a day. The Department offers a program entitled Operation ID that is designed to deter theft and assist in the recovery of personal property. DPS officers are available to participate in educational programs regarding alcohol, drugs or sexual assault.

The Department of Public Safety Office is located in Suite 214 A of Centenary Square, which is on the northeast corner of the intersection of Kings Highway and Woodlawn Avenue. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to immediately report any unusual incidents, suspicious people and/or crimes to the Department by dialing 5000 from an on campus phone or 869-5000 on an off campus phone. Members of the Centenary community should simply dial 911 in the event of an emergency. The College also maintains a hands-free “blue light” emergency campus telephone system. The Department of Public Safety has a good relationship with the other law enforcement agencies in the area and is available to assist students in reporting crimes that occurred outside the campus jurisdiction to the appropriate agency.

Community Resources
Caddo Parish Sheriff's Department
226-6555

Bossier Parish Sheriff's Department
965-2203

Shreveport Police Department
673-7300

Bossier City Police Department
741-8610

Shreveport Fire Department
673-6650

Bossier City Fire Department
741-8710

Highland Hospital
798-4300

Schumpert Medical Center
681-4500

Willis-Knighton Pierremont
212-3500

LSU Medical Center
675-6880

Willis-Knighton Bossier Health Center
752-7500

Quick Care
212-3520

Bossier Medical Center
741-6020

State Resources
Louisiana State Police
741-7411

Department of Motor Vehicles
676-5857

Drivers License and Vehicle Registration
676-5859

Dining Services
Centenary Dining Services is dedicated to serving student’s dietary needs with the highest level of quality and customer service. Centenary Dining Services provides several meal plan options. Students living in the residence halls or Greek houses are required to purchase a full meal plan. Students who require special dietary needs under the care of a physician should present their prescribed menu to the Director of Dining Services.

Disability Services
Centenary assures students with disabilities equal opportunity to reach the same level of achievement as other students in the most integrated setting appropriate to the individual’s needs. No qualified student shall be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity. Services for students with disabilities are available by contacting the Counseling Center at 869.5466, which is located on the ground floor of Rotary Residence Hall. Students are required to register with this office each semester to obtain accommodations.

Facilities Maintenance
Facility Services staff members are on call to respond to all building repair needs and emergencies. If students need their assistance concerning residence halls, they should first notify their RA and submit a maintenance request via the Internet. The maintenance request can be found linked from the Centenary College homepage. Facilities staff members generally wait until after 9:30 a.m. before entering the residence halls; therefore if you wish an earlier response time, please mention it on the work order.

Any EMERGENCIES that occur after hours or on weekends should be reported to a RA or to the Department of Public Safety at ext. 5000.

As with most campus buildings built before 1980, some of the buildings materials used during construction contain asbestos (ACBM). These areas are monitored periodically to insure there is no risk to the occupants. A comprehensive survey of each building and the location of ACBM is housed at the Facilities Services’ office and is available for review during normal business hours.

Facility and Room Reservations
All facilities must be reserved through the campus calendar. If the desired facility is not available, the Conference and Events Coordinator will assist you to find an alternate location. Student organizations requesting the use of tables or chairs may be required to leave a refundable deposit before picking up the equipment. The deposit is refunded through the Business Office after the return of the borrowed items. The Conference Office can be reached at ext. 5015. Guest rooms or houses may be available for short-term rental.

Financial Aid
Scholarships, grants, and all federal aid programs are administered by the Director of Financial Aid. Students are encouraged to visit the Office of Financial Aid if they have any concerns or problems with their awards. Veterans’ benefits are administered by the V.A. Representative in the Office of Financial Aid. The Anna Ruth Nuttall Small Loan Fund is available for students in most cases. This fund was established by the family and friends of the late Dr. Anna Ruth, Assistant Professor of Bible and English at the College until her death in 1952. Students should apply to the Business Office. Ordinarily the amount loaned will be a maximum of $25.00. Loans are payable within fifteen days. Special provisions permit College authorities to lend larger sums from the fund when an emergency arises. Other resources for students are outlined in the college catalogue.

Fitness Center
Students, staff, and faculty members of Centenary have unlimited access to the Fitness Center during operational hours, but are required to present their Centenary ID card in order to enter the building. Alumni of the College have the opportunity to purchase Fitness Center memberships at a discounted rate. Our modern Fitness Center features a natatorium, basketball courts, racquetball courts, 1/10th mile track, a workout room (with Nautilus machines, free weights, and a variety of treadmills, step machines, etc.), dance studio, aerobics room, and full locker rooms with showers and sauna.

Health Information and Services
Health-related information and services are available in the lower level of Rotary Hall. If students are in need of immediate care, the student may contact the Department of Public Safety at 869-5000. In the case of emergencies students should call 911 and notify the RAs and DPS.

The office of Health Information and Services provides basic first-aid services, some over-the-counter (OTC) medications and referrals to health professionals free of charge.

Part-Time, Graduate and Non-Degree Seeking Students are required to fill out a Proof of Immunization Compliance form which is obtained through the Admissions Office, Re-Enrollment Office, Business Department or Education Department.

Full-Time Students must provide state-required immunizations by going online to https://safe.centenary.edu/newstudent/immunizations

Sickness Benefit Plan:  All students should have their own comprehensive health insurance. Full-time students are automatically enrolled in a Student Accident and Sickness plan. Additional information can be obtained by visiting centenary.edu/life/health or by contacting Health Services at (318) 869-5466.

Referrals: Students who desire professional health care will be offered assistance in locating providers within the area. Health Services can make referrals for physicians, dentists and mental health professionals.

ID Cards
All Centenary students are required to have a valid Centenary College ID card. New students can have their ID cards made during Springboard. The first ID card is free; there is a fee for replacement cards. Centenary ID cards are made at the Department of Public Safety office, which is located in Suite 214 A of Centenary Square. When a student graduates or leaves for any other reason the ID card must be turned into the Department of Public Safety. Transcripts can be held if the card is not returned. ID cards are nontransferable and will be confiscated if someone other than the owner attempts to use a card for any purpose.

Lost and Found
Items left in the Library may be claimed at the Library Circulation Desk. If items are left elsewhere, contact Department of Public Safety. Lost articles should be taken to the Office of Student Development in the Student Union or given to a Public Safety officer.

Mail Services
All student mail is delivered to student mail boxes located on the main floor of the Student Center. Packages, bundles and mail box combinations will not be given out without a Centenary College I.D. Card. Box numbers and combinations are issued to all full-time undergraduates at orientation during the fall semester. Each student keeps the same mail box while continuously enrolled at Centenary. Students not assigned box numbers at orientation should check with the Post Office personnel as early as possible for an assignment. It is the student’s responsibility to give the Campus Post Office written notification of any change of address to ensure proper forwarding of mail. When a student leaves for the summer and plans to return in the fall, he/she may fill out a forwarding address card OR the mail will be put in the assigned mailbox and may be retrieved when he/she returns. If a student is graduating, he/she MUST fill out a forwarding address card, otherwise, the mail received will be returned to the sender. For more information, call 869-5263.

New Student Orientation
The Office of Student Involvement and a select group of returning students coordinate New Student Orientation. All first year students and transfer students entering Centenary College are required to participate in orientation. New Student Orientation occurs just prior to the start of the fall and spring semesters.

Parking
Students are responsible for knowing and abiding by all parking policies listed on the Department of Public Safety Parking Website

Student Union Building (SUB)
The Moore Student Union Building is the hub of social activities and information on campus.

The main floor of the building houses many recreational activities. Pool, ping-pong, foosball, darts, and video gaming systems are available.. The Information Center offers board games, banner-making supplies, and general campus information. Randle’s (the snack bar), the College Store, the Student Government office, the Centenary Activities Board office, and a change machine are also located on the main floor.

The Post Office and Student Development offices can be found in the lower level of the building.

Meeting space and student media offices are located on the third floor of the SUB.

Study Areas
Students have diverse study habits. While some prefer to study in their rooms or lobbies, some find they need more isolated and quieter areas with less distraction. Commuter students find they can study better on campus and look for places on campus to study. In addition to one’s room on campus, the following areas are identified as study locations:

Library during regular hours
24-hour study lounges are available in the residence halls
Mickle Hall is available for study 24 hours daily when school is in session. (Contact the Department of Public Safety at 869.5000 for access at night or on weekends.)

 

Appendices

Resources for Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Sexual Assault
Information on Health Risks Associated with the Abuse of Alcohol and Other Drugs
Louisiana Law Regarding the Unlawful Sale or Possession of Alcoholic Beverages
Louisiana Laws Regarding Controlled Substances
Louisiana Laws Regarding Sexual Assault
 

 

Resources for Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Sexual Assault
The following resources have been identified in the Shreveport-Bossier area and nationally as contacts for help with mental health, substance abuse and sexual assault. This list is not all inclusive – additional resources are available through the Centenary Counseling Center.

  • Centenary Counseling Center
    Provides brief, solution-focused counseling for students who are currently enrolled at Centenary. There is no charge for the service and information and referral to community resources is available for students, faculty and staff. Located on the ground floor of Rotary Hall. The phone number is 869.5466. For more information see: www.centenary.edu/services/counseling
  • Suicide Crisis Lines
                1-800-273-TALK       (8255)
                1-877-994-2275      
                

  • Samaritan Counseling Center
    Counseling is available on a sliding scale for individuals, couples and families for a variety of problems including sexual trauma. Christian based counseling also available. 1525 Stephens Street, Shreveport, Louisiana 318.221.6121. https://samaritanshreveport.org/
  • Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
    Offers outpatient psychiatric care at 820 Jordan Street, Shreveport, Louisiana. 676.5176.
  • Brentwood Behavioral Healthcare
    Provides inpatient and outpatient psychiatric and substance abuse treatment. Assessments are available by appointment at no charge. 1006 Highland Avenue, Shreveport, Louisiana. 678-7500.
  • Willis Knighton Behavioral Medicine
    Offers a variety of mental health services both inpatient and outpatient. 2510 Bert Kouns Industrial Loop, Shreveport, Louisiana. 632.5200.
  • Project Celebration
    Project Celebration offers many community programs such as:
    • Child Advocacy Center
    • Family Resource Center
    • Domestic Violence Program/Shelter
    • Sexual Assault Center
      (318) 226-5015 - Parishes served: Caddo, Bossier, Webster, Red River
      https://www.projectcelebration.com/default.html
      Phone: (318) 256-6242
      Toll Free: (877) 907-6241
  • Veterans Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE or 1-800-656-4673
  • Online Crisis Chat Services: Crisischat.org
  • LGBTQ+ crisis line: 1-866-4-U-TREVOR or 1-866-488-7386
  • Eating Disorders Helpline 1-800-931-2237
  • CORE Center of Recovery
    is an intense residential 60-day treatment program for compulsive gamblers. Free for Louisiana residents. Call for days and times for Gambling Anonymous meetings in the area. 635 Stoner Avenue, Shreveport, Louisiana. 424.4357.
  • The Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse
    The Council provides assessment, referral, treatment, education and prevention on a sliding scale. 2000 Fairfield Avenue, Shreveport, Louisiana. 222.8511.
  • Northwest Louisiana Human Services District - We provide mental health, addictive disorder, and developmental disability services in Northwest Louisiana. Our service area includes residents in Bienville, Bossier Caddo, Claiborne, DeSoto, Natchitoches, Red River, Sabine and Webster parishes. http://www.nlhsd.org/ . For Shreveport: 1310 Hearne Avenue, Shreveport, Louisiana. 318.676.5111.
  • Alcoholic’s Anonymous
    The local office provides information regarding the times and locations of more the 180 meetings in the Shreveport/Bossier Area. 2800 Youree Drive, Shreveport, Louisiana. Phone answered 24 hours a day 318.865.2172. One AA meeting is held on campus. Contact the Centenary Counseling Center for meeting time and location. On the web: http://www.aa.org.
  • Al-Anon
    A fellowship of relative and friends of alcoholics who believe their lives have been affected by someone else’s drinking. There are a number of meetings in the area, call 318.683.1399 for time and locations.
    http://www.al-anon.alateen.org.

  • Narcotics Anonymous
    Offers recovery support groups for those who use or abuse substances. Call 318.677.4344 for more information.
  • National Institute of Mental Health
                301.443.4513      
    http://www.nimh.nih.gov/home.cfm
  • National Mental Health Association
                800.969.6642      
    http://www.nmha.org/ccd/index.cfm
  • American College Association
                410.859.1500      
    http://www.acha.org
  • American Psychiatric Association
                202.683.6220      
    http://www.psych.org

 

Information on Health Risks Associated with the Abuse of Alcohol and Other Drugs

Abuse of alcohol and other drugs is dangerous and poses a threat to life and health. People who suffer from addiction often have one or more accompanying medical issues, which may include lung or cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, and mental disorders. More information on these health risks is available at DrugAbuse.gov.

 

Louisiana Law Regarding the Unlawful Sale, Purchase and Possession of Alcoholic Beverages

R.S. 14:93.10 Definitions

For the purposes of R.S. 14:93.10 through 93.14, the following definitions shall apply:

(1) “Purchase” means acquisition by the payment of money or other consideration. Purchase does not include such acquisition for medical purposes either when purchased as over the counter medication or when prescribed or administered by a licensed physician, pharmacist, dentist, nurse, hospital, or medical institution.

(2) “Public possession” means the possession of any alcoholic beverage for any reason, including consumption, on any street or highway or in any public place or any place open to the public, including a club which is de facto open to the public. “Public possession” does not include the following:

(a) The possession or consumption of any alcoholic beverage:

(i) For an established religious purpose.

(ii) When a person under twenty-one years of age is accompanied by a parent, spouse, or legal guardian twenty-one years of age or older.

(iii) For medical purposes when purchased as an over the counter medication, or when prescribed or administered by a licensed physician, pharmacist, dentist, nurse, hospital or medical institution.

(iv) In private residences.

(b) The sale, handling, transport, or service in dispensing of any alcoholic beverage pursuant to lawful ownership of an establishment or to lawful employment of a person under twenty-one years of age by a duly licensed manufacturer, wholesaler, or retailer of beverage alcohol.

(3) “Alcoholic beverage” means beer, distilled spirits, and wine containing one-half of one percent or more of alcohol by volume. Beer includes but is not limited to ale, lager, porter, stout, sake, and other similar fermented beverages brewed or produced from malt wholly or in part or from any substitute therefor. Distilled spirits include alcohol, ethanol, or spirits or wine in any form, including all dilutions and mixtures thereof from whatever process produced.

 

R.S. 14:93.11 Unlawful sales to persons under twenty-one

A. Unlawful sales to persons under twenty-one is the selling or otherwise delivering for value of any alcoholic beverage to any person under twenty-one years of age unless such person is the lawful owner or lawful employee of an establishment to which the sale is being made and is accepting delivery pursuant to such ownership or employment. Lack of knowledge of the person’s age shall not be a defense.

B. Whoever violates the provisions of this Section shall be fined not more than one hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.


R.S. 14:93.12 Purchase and public possession of alcoholic beverages; exceptions; penalties

A. It is unlawful for any person under twenty-one years of age to purchase or have public possession of any alcoholic beverage.

B. (1) Whoever violates the provisions of this Section shall be fined not more than one hundred
dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.

(2) Any person apprehended while violating the provisions of this Section shall be issued a
citation by the apprehending law enforcement officer, which shall be paid in the same manner as provided for the offenders of local traffic violations.


R.S. 14:93.13 Unlawful purchase of alcoholic beverages by persons on behalf of persons under twenty-one.

A. It is unlawful for any person, other than a parent, spouse, or legal guardian, as specified in RS 14:93.10(2) (a) (ii), to purchase on behalf of a person under twenty-one years of age any alcoholic beverage.

B. Whoever violates the provisions of this Section shall be fined not more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than thirty days, or both.

 

R.S. 14:93.14 Responsibilities of retail dealer not relieved

 

Nothing in RS 14:93.10 through 93.13 shall be construed as relieving any licensed retail dealer in alcoholic beverages any responsibilities imposed under the provisions of Title 26 of the Louisiana Revised Statutes of 1950.

 

Louisiana Law regarding driving while under the influence of alcoholic beverages or drugs

R.S. 14:98 Operating a vehicle while intoxicated

A. (1) The crime of operating a vehicle while intoxicated is the operating of any motor vehicle, aircraft, watercraft, vessel, or other means of conveyance when: 

(a) The operator is under the influence of alcoholic beverages; or

(b) The operator’s blood alcohol concentration is 0.08 percent or more by weight based on grams of alcohol per one hundred cubic centimeters of blood; or

(c) The operator is under the influence of any controlled dangerous substance listed in Schedule I, II, III, IV, V as set forth in R.S. 40:964

(d) The operator is under the influence of a combination of alcohol and one or more drugs which are not controlled dangerous substances and which are legally obtainable with or without a prescription and the label on the container of the prescription drug or the manufacturer’s package of the drug contains a warning against combining the medication with alcohol.

(e) The operator is under the influence of one or more drugs which are not controlled dangerous substances and which are legally obtainable with or without a prescription and the influence is caused by the operator knowingly consuming
quantities of the drug or drugs which substantially exceed the dosage prescribed by the physician or the dosage recommended by the manufacturer of the drug.

(2) A valid driver’s license shall not be an element of the offense, and the lack thereof shall not be a defense to a prosecution for operating a vehicle while intoxicated.

B. (1) On a first conviction, notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, the offender shall be fined not less than three hundred dollars nor more than one thousand dollars, and shall be imprisoned for not less than ten days nor more than six months. Imposition or execution of sentence shall not be suspended unless:

(a) the offender is placed on probation with a minimum condition that he serve two days in jail and participate in a court-approved substance abuse program and participate in a court-approved driver improvement program; or

(b) The offender is placed on probation with a minimum condition that he perform four eight-hour days of court-approved community service activities, at least half of which shall consist of participation in a litter abatement or collection program, participate in a court-approved substance abuse program, and participate in a court-approved driver improvement program. An offender, who participates in a litter abatement or collection program pursuant to this Subparagraph, shall have no cause of action for damages against the entity conducting the program or supervising his participation therein, including a municipality, parish, sheriff, or other entity, nor against any official, employee, or agent of such entity, for any injury or loss suffered by him during or arising out of his participation in the program, if such injury or loss is a direct result of the lack of supervision or act or omission of the supervisor, unless the injury or loss was caused by the intentional or grossly negligent act or omission of the entity or its official, employee, or agent.

(2) If the offender had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.15 percent or more by weight based on grams of alcohol per one hundred cubic centimeters of blood, at least forty-eight hours of the sentence imposed pursuant to Paragraph (B) (1) of this Section shall be served without the benefit of parole, probation, or suspension of sentence. Imposition or execution of the remainder of the sentence shall not be suspended unless the offender complies with Paragraph (B) (1) (a) or (b) of this Section.

C. (1) On a conviction of a second offense, notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, except as provided in Paragraph (3) of this subsection, regardless of whether the second offense occurred before or after the first conviction, the offender shall be fined not less than seven hundred fifty dollars, nor more than one thousand dollars, and shall be imprisoned for not less than thirty days nor more than six months. At least forty-eight hours of the sentence imposed shall be served without benefit of parole, probation, or suspension of sentence. Nothing herein shall prohibit a court from sentencing a defendant to home incarceration, if otherwise allowed under the provisions of Article 894.2 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. Imposition or execution of the remainder of the sentence shall not be suspended unless:

(a) The offender is placed on probation with a minimum condition that he serve fifteen days in jail and participate in a court-approved substance abuse program and participate in a court-approved driver improvement program; or

(b) The offender is placed on probation with a minimum condition that he perform thirty eight-hour days of court-approved community service activities, at least half of which shall consist of participation in a litter abatement or collection program, and participate in a court-approved substance abuse program, and participate in a court-approved driver improvement program. . .

(2) If the offender had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.15 percent or more by weight based on grams of alcohol per one hundred cubic centimeters of blood, at least ninety-six hours of the sentence imposed pursuant to Paragraph (C) (1) of this Section shall be served without the benefit of parole, probation, or suspension of sentence. Imposition or execution of the remainder of the sentence shall not be suspended unless the offender complies with Paragraph (C) (1) (a) or (b) of this section.

(3) Notwithstanding the provisions of Paragraph (1) of the Subsection, on a conviction of a second offense when the first offense was for the crime of vehicular homicide in violation of R.S. 14:32.1, or first degree vehicular negligent injuring in violation of R.S. 14:39.2, the offender shall be imprisoned with or without hard labor for not less than one year nor more than five years, and shall be fined two thousand dollars. At least six months of the sentence of imprisonment imposed shall be without benefit of probation, parole, or suspension of sentence. Imposition or execution of the remainder of the sentence shall not be suspended unless the provisions of Subparagraph (C)(1)(a) or (b) are complied with.

D. (1) On a conviction of a third offense, notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary and regardless of whether the offense occurred before or after an earlier conviction, the offender shall be imprisoned with or without hard labor for not less than one year nor more than five years, and shall be fined two thousand dollars. Thirty days of the sentence of imprisonment shall be imposed without benefit of probation, parole or suspension of sentence. The remainder of the sentence of imprisonment shall be suspended and the offender shall be required to undergo an evaluation to determine the nature and extent of the offender’s substance abuse disorder. The treatment professional performing the evaluation shall recommend appropriate treatment modalities which shall include substance abuse treatment at an inpatient facility recommended by the Department of Health and Hospitals, office (sic) for addictive disorders and approved by the Department of Public Safety and Corrections for a period of not less than four weeks nor more than six weeks. The offender may be sentenced to additional outpatient substance abuse treatment services to meet the offender’s needs if determined to be necessary by the offender’s treating physician, for a period not to exceed twelve months. The follow up treatment shall be provided in a manner to gradually decrease the intensity of treatment services. Upon successful completion of the inpatient substance abuse treatment required by this paragraph, the offender shall be sentenced to home incarceration for not less than the period of time remaining on the offender’s suspended sentence, as provided in Paragraph (3) of this Subsection. If the offender fails to complete the substance abuse treatment required by the provision of this Paragraph or violates any condition of home incarceration, he shall be imprisoned for the original term of his suspended sentence with no credit for time served under home incarceration.

(2) (a) In addition, the court shall order that the vehicle being driven by the offender at the time of the offense shall be seized and impounded, and sold at auction in the same manner and under the same conditions as executions of writ of seizures and sale as
provided in Book V, Title II, Chapter 4 of the Code of Civil Procedure.

(b) The vehicle shall be exempt from sale if it was stolen, or if the driver of the vehicle at the time of the violation was not the owner and the owner did not know that the driver was operating the vehicle while intoxicated. If this exemption is applicable, the vehicle shall not be released from impoundment until such time as towing and storage fees have been paid.

(c) In addition, the vehicle shall be exempt from sale if all towing and storage fees are paid by a valid lien holder.

(d) The proceeds of the sale shall first be used to pay court costs and towing and storage costs, and the remainder shall be forwarded to the Council on Automobile Insurance Rates and Enforcement for its use in studying other ways to reduce drunk driving and insurance rates.

(3) (a) An offender sentenced to home incarceration shall be supervised and shall be subject to any of the conditions of probation. The court shall specify the conditions of home incarceration which shall include but shall not be limited to the following:

(i) Electronic monitoring.

(ii) Curfew restrictions.

(iii) Home visitation at least once per month by the Department of Public Safety and Corrections.

(b) The court shall also require the offender to obtain employment and to participate in a court approved driver improvement program at his expense. The activities of the offender outside of his home shall be limited to traveling to and from work, church services, Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, or a court approved driver improvement program.

(c) Offenders sentenced to home incarceration required under the provisions of this Section shall be subject to all other applicable provisions of Code of Criminal Procedure Article 894.2.

E. (1) Except as otherwise provided in Subparagraph (4) (b) of this Subsection, on a conviction of fourth or subsequent offense, notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary and regardless of whether the fourth offense occurred before or after an earlier conviction, the offender shall be imprisoned with or without hard labor for not less than ten years nor more than thirty years, and shall be fined five thousand dollars. Sixty days of the sentence of imprisonment shall be imposed without benefit of probation, parole, or suspension of sentence. The remainder of the sentence of imprisonment shall be suspended and the offender shall be required to undergo an evaluation to determine the nature and extent of the offender’s substance abuse disorder. The treatment professional performing the evaluation shall recommend appropriate treatment modalities which shall include substance abuse treatment at an inpatient facility recommended by the Department of Health and Hospitals, officer (sic) addictive disorders and approved by the Department of Public Safety and Corrections for a period of not less than four weeks nor more than six weeks. The offender may be sentenced to additional substance abuse treatment services to meet the offender’s needs if determined to be necessary by the offender’s treating physician, for a period not to exceed twelve months. The follow up treatment shall be provided in a manner to gradually decrease the intensity of treatment services. Upon successful completion of the inpatient substance abuse treatment required by this paragraph, the offender shall be sentenced to home incarceration for not less than one nor more than five years, in accordance with Paragraph (3) of this Subsection, and shall be fined five thousand dollars. If the offender fails to complete the substance abuse treatment required by the provisions of this Paragraph or violates any condition of home incarceration, he shall be imprisoned for the original term of his suspended sentence with no credit for time served under home incarceration.

(2) (a) In addition, the court shall order that the vehicle being driven by the offender at the time of the offense be seized and impounded, and be sold at auction in the same manner and under the same conditions as executions of writ of seizure and sale as provided in Book V, Title II, Chapter 4 of the Code of Civil Procedure…

(3) (a) An offender sentenced to home incarceration shall be supervised and shall be subject to any of the conditions of probation. The court shall specify the conditions of home incarceration which shall include but shall not be limited to the following:

(i) Electronic monitoring.

(ii) Curfew Restrictions.

(iii) Home visitation at least once per month by the Department of Public Safety and Corrections.

(b) The court shall also require the offender to obtain employment and to participate in a court-approved driver improvement program at his expense. The activities of the offender outside of his home shall be limited to traveling to and from work, church services, Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, or a court approved driver improvement program.

(c) Offenders sentenced to home incarceration required under the provisions of this Section shall be subject to all other applicable provisions of Code of Criminal Procedure Article 894.2.

(4) (a) If the offender has previously been required to participate in substance abuse treatment and home incarceration, pursuant to Subsection D of this Section, the offender shall not be sentenced to substance abuse treatment and home incarceration for a fourth or subsequent offense, but shall be imprisoned at hard labor for not less than ten nor more than thirty years, and at least three years of the sentence shall be imposed without benefit of suspension of sentence, probation or parole.

(b) If the offender has previously received the benefit of suspension of sentence, probation, or parole as a fourth offender, no part of the sentence may be imposed with benefit of suspension of sentence, probation or parole, and no portion of the sentence shall be imposed concurrently with the remaining balance of any sentence to be served for a prior conviction for any offense.

F. (1) For purposes of determining whether a defendant has a prior conviction for violation of this Section, a conviction under either R.S. 14:32.1, vehicular homicide, R.S. 14:39.1, vehicular negligent injuring, or R.S. 14:39.2, first degree vehicular negligent injuring, or a conviction under the laws of any state or an ordinance of a municipality, town, or similar political subdivision of another state, which prohibits the operation of any motor vehicle, aircraft, watercraft, vessel, or other means of conveyance while intoxicated, while impaired or while under the influence of alcohol, drugs or any controlled dangerous substance shall constitute a prior conviction. This determination shall be made by the court as a matter of law.

(2) For the purposes of this Section, a prior conviction shall not include a conviction for an offense under this Section or R.S. 14:32.1 or R.S. 14:39.1 or under comparable statute or ordinance of another jurisdiction, as described in Paragraph (1) of this Subsection, if committed more than ten years prior to the commission of the crime for which the defendant is being tried and such conviction shall not be considered in the assessment of penalties hereunder. However, periods of time during which the offender was incarcerated in a penal institution in this or any other state shall be excluded in computing the ten-year period. Subsections Band C shall include a screening procedure to determine the portions of the program which may be applicable and appropriate for individual offenders.

G. The legislature hereby finds and declares that conviction of a third or subsequent DWI offense is presumptive evidence of the existence of a substance abuse disorder in the offender posing a serious threat to the health and safety of the public. Further, the legislature finds that there are successful treatment methods available for treatment of addictive disorders. Court approved substance abuse programs provided for in Subsection B, C, and D of this section shall include a screening procedure to determine the portions of the program which may be applicable and appropriate for individual offenders and shall assess the offender’s degree of alcohol abuse.

H. “Community service activities” as used in this Section may include duty in any morgue, coroner’s office, or emergency treatment room of a state-operated hospital or other state operated hospital or other state-operated emergency treatment facility, with the consent of the administrator of the morgue, coroner’s office, hospital or facility.

I. An offender ordered to participate in a substance abuse program required by the provisions of this section shall pay the cost incurred in participating in the program. Failure to make such payment shall subject the offender to revocation of probation, unless the court determines that the offender is unable to pay. If the court determines that the offender is unable to pay, the state shall pay for the cost of the Substance Abuse treatment required by this section. An offender sentenced to Home Incarceration and to participate in a Driver Improvement Program shall pay the cost incurred in participating in said programs, unless the court determines that the offender is unable to pay.

J. This Subsection shall be cited as the “Child Endangerment Law.” When the state proves in addition to the elements of the crime as set forth in Subsection A of this Section that a minor child twelve years of age or younger was a passenger in the motor vehicle, aircraft, watercraft, vessel, or other means of motorized conveyance at the time of the commission of the offense, of the sentence imposed by the court, the execution of the minimum mandatory sentence provided by Subsection B or C of this Section, as appropriate, shall not be suspended. If imprisonment is imposed pursuant to the provisions of Subsection E, at two years of the sentence shall be imposed without benefit of suspension of sentence.

K. (1) In addition to any penalties imposed under this Section, upon conviction of a second or subsequent offense, any vehicle, while being operated by the offender, shall be equipped with a functioning ignition interlock device in accordance with the provisions of R.S.15:306. This requirement shall remain in effect for a period of not less than six months. In addition, the device shall remain installed and operative during any period that the offender’s operator’s license is suspended under and for any additional period as determined by the court.

(2) (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of Paragraph (1) of this Subsection and R.S. 32:414

(D) (1) (b), upon conviction of a third or subsequent offense of the provisions of this section, any motor vehicle, while being operated by the offender, shall be equipped with functioning ignition interlock device in accordance with the provision of R.S. 15: 306. The ignition interlock device shall remain installed and operative until the offender has completed the requirements of substance abuse treatment and home incarceration under the provisions of Subsections D and E of this Section.

(b) Any offender convicted of a third or subsequent offense of the provisions of this Section shall, after one year of the suspension required by R.S. 32:414 (d) (1) (a), upon proof to the Department of Public Safety and Corrections that the motor vehicles being operated by the offender are equipped with functioning interlock devices, be issued a restricted driver’s license. The restricted license shall be effective for the period of time that the offender’s driver’s license is suspended. The restricted license shall entitle the offender to operate the vehicles equipped with a functioning interlock device in order to earn a livelihood and to travel and from the places designated in Paragraph (D) (3) and (E) (3) of this Section.

(3) The provisions of this subsection shall not require installation of an interlock device in any vehicle described in RS 32:378.2(I)

 

R.S. 14: 98.1 Underage driving under the influence

A. The crime of underage operating a vehicle while intoxicated is the operating of any motor vehicle, aircraft, watercraft, vessel or other means of conveyance when the operator’s blood alcohol concentration is 0.02 percent or more by weight if the operator is under the age of twenty-one based on grams of alcohol per one hundred cubic centimeters of blood.

B. Any underage person whose blood alcohol concentration is found to be in violation of R.S. 14:98(A) (1) (b) shall be charged under its provisions rather than under this Section.

C. On a first conviction, the offender shall be fined not less than one hundred nor more than two hundred fifty dollars, and participate in a court-approved substance abuse and driver improvement program.

D. On a second or subsequent conviction, regardless of whether the second offense occurred before or after the first conviction, the offender shall be fined not less than one hundred fifty dollars, nor more than five hundred dollars, and imprisoned for not less than ten days nor more than three months. Imposition or execution of sentence shall not be suspended unless:

(1) The offender is placed on probation with a minimum condition that he serve forty-eight hours in jail and participate in a court-approved substance abuse and driver improvement program; or

(2) The offender is placed on probation with a minimum condition that he perform ten eight-hour days of court-approved community service activities, at least half of which shall consist of participation in a litter abatement or collection program and participate in a court-approved substance and driver improvement program.

E. Court programs regarding substance abuse provided for in Subsections C and D shall include a screening procedure to determine the portions of the program which may be applicable and appropriate for individual offenders.

F. An offender ordered to participate in a substance abuse program shall pay the cost incurred in participating in the program. Failure to make such payment shall subject the offender to revocation of probation, unless the court determines that the offender is unable to pay.

 

Louisiana Laws Regarding Controlled Substances

Click here for a chart of Louisiana Laws Regarding Controlled Substances

 

Louisiana Laws Regarding Sexual Assault
 

Note that this chart is for general reference purposes only and is not intended as a full disclosure on all sex offenses.

Title of Offense Louisiana Revised
Statute Number
Penalty
Aggravated Rape R.S. 14:42 Death or Life Imprisonment at hard labor.
Forcible Rape R.S. 14:42.1 Imprisoned at hard labor 5-40 years.
Simple Rape R.S. 14:43 Imprisoned with or without hard labor not more than 25 years.
Sexual Battery

R.S. 14:43.1 Imprisoned with or without hard labor not more than 10 years.
Aggravated Sexual Battery R.S. 14:43.2 Imprisonment with or without hard labor for not more than 15 years.
Intentional Exposure to AIDS virus R.S. 14:43.5 Imprisoned with or without hard labor for not more than 11 years and/or fined not more than $6000.00
Administering a Controlled Dangerous Substance to a victim in order to commit a crime of violence (such as rape) R.S.40:969D Imprisoned at hard labor for not less than five years nor more than 40 years and may be fined up to $100,000.00

 

The sentences for these crimes are without benefit of probation, parole or suspension of sentence.

 

 

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