Washington Monthly names Centenary a "Best Bang for the Buck" college

SHREVEPORT, LA — Centenary College of Louisiana has been named a top 30 "Best Bang for the Buck Southern College" by Washington Monthly magazine. The publication's fourth annual ranking identifies American colleges and universities that consistently deliver an affordable, high-quality education that positions students for career success.

"Recognition as a 'Best Bang for the Buck' college by Washington Monthly is significant for a liberal arts institution like Centenary," says President Christopher L. Holoman. "This accolade confirms what we at Centenary know – that the flexible critical thinking skills provided by a liberal arts education are a wise investment in today's rapidly-changing professional world."

Data from the new College Scorecard issued by the U.S. Department of Education was incorporated into Washington Monthly's rankings for the first time in 2016. The College Scorecard provides, among other data, information about how much students earn ten years after enrolling in a particular college as well as the percent of first-generation students the college serves.

According to Washington Monthly's findings, 92% of Centenary graduates are able to begin repaying student loan principals within five years of graduation. This statistic helped the College earn the fourth-strongest "repayment rate performance rank" among the 100 southern colleges included in the "Best Bang for the Buck" list.

Centenary tracks graduates' success through periodic surveys. As of July 2016, 90% of graduates in the Class of 2015 were enrolled in graduate school, working in their chosen field, or pursuing career-building internships. The Washington Monthly data on affordability provides important context for these survey results.

"Centenary students graduate with the transferable and cultural skills that are valued by graduate schools and employers in today's job market," says Rachael Peters, Director of Professional Success at Centenary. "Centenary's liberal arts education gives students the tools necessary to effectively problem-solve, a skill that employers and admission offices alike look for in potential candidates."