Current Exhibitions 

LOST STORIEs, FOUND IMAGES: PORTRAITS OF JEWS IN WARTIME AMSTERDAM BY ANNEMIE WOLFF

January 8-March 23, 2018

German-born Dutch photographer Annemie Wolff took formal portraits of Amsterdam's Jews at a time of great danger both for her and for her subjects during the German occupation of The Netherlands. Some of these photos were taken for false papers to aid these individuals in their escape. Other images were taken as mementos for friends, relatives in camps or of remembrances of children when parents went into hiding. These previously lost works, rediscovered in 2008 by Dutch photo historian Simon Kool, help illuminate an untold story of Jewish life in Amsterdam during the Holocaust.

This exhibition is supported by the Van Thyn lecture series, which honors Rose and Louis Van Thyn, Holocaust survivors who dedicated themselves to retelling their stories so that people would not forget or repeat those horrors. For her extraordinary community service, Mrs. Van Thyn was awarded the honorary Doctor of Humane Letters at Centenary's 2002 commencement exercises.

Friends of the Van Thyns established the Rose and Louis Van Thyn Board of Regents Endowed Lectureship in November 2009. The Van Thyn Lectureship provides educational opportunities for the students of the College and members of the surrounding community, with a goal of teaching about the history of the Holocaust, and how to recognize signs of intolerance and provide a means for preventing prejudice and hatred.

Lost Stories, Found Images: Portraits of Jews in Wartime Amsterdam by Annemie Wolff is a project of, an original exhibit created by, and is on loan from the Wolff Foundation, Amsterdam in partnership with the San Francisco-based Jewish Community Federation.

Photo by Annemie Wolff. Copyright: Monica Kaltenschnee, Haarlem, Holland.

 

A Glimpse of Shreveport from 1918

February-April 2018

"Shreveport's progressiveness can be seen at a glance" according to this 100-year-old Chamber of Commerce album from the private collection of Shreveport educator Edward Chopin. This exhibition, created with the Shreveport Historic Preservation Society, will feature a selection from its more than 300 anonymous, stunning gelatin silver photographs showcasing Shreveport's businesses and labor force in 1918. (Images at right: Collection of Edward Chopin.)